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Old 01-14-2008, 07:45 AM
Rod Speed
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Default Re: How To Pick The Right Telstra Next G Mobile

Alan Parkington <alanparkington@team.telstra.net> wrote

> From
> http://www.smartofficenews.com.au/Co...ation/R7E5F4X8


> Telstra is due to cut off its old CDMA mobile service in about two weeks' time,


We'll see...

> and if you have not upgraded your mobile phone to a NextG network compatible phone, you will need to do so to stay
> connected.


Only if they actually are allowed to turn it off then.

> Telstra encourages those living or travelling in rural Australia to be extra careful when selecting a Next G handset.
> To make the selection easier for consumers, Telstra has set up the "Blue Tick" program, which is designed to recognise
> the mobile phones that will work best in rural areas.


Pity about those who use those who get a worse result
with the NextG system than they did with the cdma system.

> "There are now more than 30 handsets on Telstra's Next G network,


You'll have to pardon us if we dont actually swoon or sumfin.

> including seven that have the Blue Tick for recommended handheld use in rural areas,"


You'll have to pardon us if we dont actually swoon or sumfin.

> said Telstra Country Wide Director, Gary Goldsworthy.


> "With mobile phones, it's not a case of 'one size fits all'


Must be one of those rocket scientist telstra ****wits.

> and that's why we introduced the world-first Blue Tick program - to help
> customers identify the handsets that will perform best in rural areas.


Pity about those who use those who get a worse result
with the NextG system than they did with the cdma system.

> No other mobile phone company offers this kind of service for its customers.


Get you hand off your dick, boy.

> Handsets with the Blue Tick of approval include the Telstra Country
> Phone 165, LG TU 550, LG TU 500 (prepaid), Nokia N95, Samsung A412, Samsung A411 (prepaid), and the Sony Ericsson
> Z750i.


> Mr Goldsworthy said several factors needed to be considered when customers migrated to the Telstra Next G network:


The most obvious question is why telstra should be allowed to turn the cdma system off.

> . Whether they need to maximise their coverage experience;


'coverage experience' eh ? Wota ****ing ******.

> . Where they will be using the device - metropolitan areas, regional
> areas or rural areas within the Next G network coverage area; and


Must be one of those rocket scientist telstra ****wits.

> . Whether they will use it in handheld mode or in a car with either a directly coupled car kit or patch lead and
> external antenna.


Must be one of those rocket scientist telstra ****wits.

> "As with any mobile network, coverage on the Next G network depends on where a person is, what particular handset that
> person is using and whether that handset has an external antenna attached.


Must be one of those rocket scientist telstra ****wits.

> "For example, CDMA customers should do a 'like for like' upgrade by ensuring that if they are using a car kit or
> external antenna with
> their CDMA device, then they also use a car kit with a directly
> coupled external antenna with their new Next G device.


Pity about those who get a much worse result even when they do that.

> See: www.telstra.com.au


Pathetic.



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