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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 12-07-2006, 10:43 PM
SMS
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Default TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

"http://www.techweb.com/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=196601406"

"Both T-Mobile and Cingular had an advantage not available for Verizon
and Sprint users: their GSM-based phones can usually be used in many
non-U.S. countries, CR observed."

That's great news, as there are certainly a lot of non-U.S. countries.

Actually, you can use CDMA phones in a lot of non-U.S. countries as
well, just not as many as with GSM phones. And there are several
countries where CDMA works but GSM doesn't, including Japan and Korea.
CDMA is growing by leaps and bounds, with a lot of new deployments in
4Q2006, and more coming next year, especially at 450MHz.

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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 12-07-2006, 10:54 PM
John Navas
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Default Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

On Thu, 07 Dec 2006 15:43:29 -0800, SMS <scharf.steven@geemail.com>
wrote in <4578a722$0$82615$742ec2ed@news.sonic.net>:

>"http://www.techweb.com/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=196601406"
>
>"Both T-Mobile and Cingular had an advantage not available for Verizon
>and Sprint users: their GSM-based phones can usually be used in many
>non-U.S. countries, CR observed."
>
>That's great news, as there are certainly a lot of non-U.S. countries.
>
>Actually, you can use CDMA phones in a lot of non-U.S. countries as
>well, just not as many as with GSM phones.


Actually not very many, and more importantly not with local pre-paid
SIMs, a huge advantage of GSM over CDMA2000.

>And there are several
>countries where CDMA works but GSM doesn't, including Japan and Korea.


That's 2, not "several". GSM works in vastly more places than CDMA2000.
See GSMWorld.com

>CDMA is growing by leaps and bounds, with a lot of new deployments in
>4Q2006, and more coming next year, especially at 450MHz.


CDMA2000 is actually on the decline, with Nokia having abandoned it,
Sprint migrating to WiMAX, other countries thinking of dumping it (e.g.,
India), and even Qualcomm is hedging its bets.

Kindly take your CDMA2000 trolling someplace else.

--
Best regards, FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS:
John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>

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  #3 (permalink)  
Old 12-08-2006, 07:30 AM
Dennis Ferguson
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

On 2006-12-07, SMS <scharf.steven@geemail.com> wrote:
> "http://www.techweb.com/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=196601406"
>
> "Both T-Mobile and Cingular had an advantage not available for Verizon
> and Sprint users: their GSM-based phones can usually be used in many
> non-U.S. countries, CR observed."
>
> That's great news, as there are certainly a lot of non-U.S. countries.
>
> Actually, you can use CDMA phones in a lot of non-U.S. countries as
> well, just not as many as with GSM phones. And there are several
> countries where CDMA works but GSM doesn't, including Japan and Korea.
> CDMA is growing by leaps and bounds, with a lot of new deployments in
> 4Q2006, and more coming next year, especially at 450MHz.


That's a little bogus. I'm not positive but I don't think any Verizon or
Sprint phone will roam in Japan, I think the CDMA frequency assignments in
Japan are different. You can, however, roam in both Japan and Korea
with a GSM SIM if you buy a WCDMA phone to put it in (and if you stick to
the cities). I also doubt whether Verizon or Sprint will be offering
phones supporting 450 MHz, that is in the middle of an amateur
band in the US and is hence unavailable for use in their service area.

There used to be, however, a saving grace to CDMA roaming with a Verizon
phone, that being that if the phone worked in the country you were in the
charges (for local and incoming calls at least) were a reasonably modest
(for international roaming) $0.69 per minute. Unfortunately, since Verizon
has almost doubled its prices for most countries (Sprint's prices were
always outrageous), even that advantage has mostly gone and there remains no
reason to carry a US CDMA phone outside the country.

Or almost no reason. I still think Verizon's North America's Choice
plans are a fantastic deal if you travel frequently to Canada or
(particularly) Mexico. This is one of the two reasons I have a Verizon
phone, the other being SF bay area mountain coverage.

Dennis Ferguson

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  #4 (permalink)  
Old 12-08-2006, 05:55 PM
Joel Kolstad
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Default Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

"SMS" <scharf.steven@geemail.com> wrote in message
news:4578a722$0$82615$742ec2ed@news.sonic.net...
> "Both T-Mobile and Cingular had an advantage not available for Verizon and
> Sprint users: their GSM-based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S.
> countries, CR observed."


"Usually" is probably rather overstated: Unless someone specifically purchased
an unlocked phone from their U.S.-based GSM carrier, I'd say the odds of the
average person having such a phone is perhaps... 1 in 10?

Granted, trying to use a CDMA phone outside the U.S. is probably a 1 in 1000
shot; I'd be surprised if we could find anyone who has successfully taken,
e.g., a Sprint phone and gotten it to work in, say, Japan. But perhaps I'm
horribly mistaken...





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  #5 (permalink)  
Old 12-08-2006, 07:10 PM
SMS
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S.countries."

Joel Kolstad wrote:
> "SMS" <scharf.steven@geemail.com> wrote in message
> news:4578a722$0$82615$742ec2ed@news.sonic.net...
>> "Both T-Mobile and Cingular had an advantage not available for Verizon and
>> Sprint users: their GSM-based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S.
>> countries, CR observed."

>
> "Usually" is probably rather overstated: Unless someone specifically purchased
> an unlocked phone from their U.S.-based GSM carrier, I'd say the odds of the
> average person having such a phone is perhaps... 1 in 10?


True, but the frequent European or Asian traveler has probably figured
it out.

> Granted, trying to use a CDMA phone outside the U.S. is probably a 1 in 1000
> shot; I'd be surprised if we could find anyone who has successfully taken,
> e.g., a Sprint phone and gotten it to work in, say, Japan. But perhaps I'm
> horribly mistaken...


No, you're not mistaken. However the story is different in Korea, where
it's relatively easy to use a CDMA phone, as well as in China, India,
etc. New CDMA networks are being deployed in a lot of countries, and
coverage is expanding in existing countries. It's not that these
countries were so keen on a second standard, but in the densely
populated countries, they needed the higher efficiency of CDMA.

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  #6 (permalink)  
Old 12-08-2006, 07:54 PM
SMS
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S.countries."

SMS wrote:

> No, you're not mistaken. However the story is different in Korea, where
> it's relatively easy to use a CDMA phone, as well as in China, India,
> etc. New CDMA networks are being deployed in a lot of countries, and
> coverage is expanding in existing countries. It's not that these
> countries were so keen on a second standard, but in the densely
> populated countries, they needed the higher efficiency of CDMA.


Also note that you can get a combo CDMA 800/1900 & GSM 900/1800 handset
from Verizon. This gives you the best of both worlds. You get Verizon's
superior U.S. network, and you can roam on CDMA and GSM in other countries.

Personally, I prefer buying a prepaid GSM SIM card when traveling, as
it's much more cost efficient. Even when I can claim the cost on an
expense report, it just galls me to pay the international roaming charges.

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  #7 (permalink)  
Old 12-08-2006, 10:03 PM
John Navas
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

On Fri, 8 Dec 2006 10:55:44 -0800, "Joel Kolstad"
<JKolstad71HatesSpam@yahoo.com> wrote in
<12njd9i6m51h090@corp.supernews.com>:

>"SMS" <scharf.steven@geemail.com> wrote in message
>news:4578a722$0$82615$742ec2ed@news.sonic.net.. .
>> "Both T-Mobile and Cingular had an advantage not available for Verizon and
>> Sprint users: their GSM-based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S.
>> countries, CR observed."

>
>"Usually" is probably rather overstated: Unless someone specifically purchased
>an unlocked phone from their U.S.-based GSM carrier, I'd say the odds of the
>average person having such a phone is perhaps... 1 in 10?


Both T-Mobile and Cingular will unlock phones on request by customers in
good standing.

--
Best regards, FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS:
John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>

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  #8 (permalink)  
Old 12-08-2006, 10:07 PM
John Navas
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

On Fri, 08 Dec 2006 12:10:02 -0800, SMS <scharf.steven@geemail.com>
wrote in <4579c6a4$0$82534$742ec2ed@news.sonic.net>:

>... However the story is different in Korea, where
>it's relatively easy to use a CDMA phone, as well as in China, India,
>etc. New CDMA networks are being deployed in a lot of countries, and
>coverage is expanding in existing countries. It's not that these
>countries were so keen on a second standard, but in the densely
>populated countries, they needed the higher efficiency of CDMA.


In fact CDMA2000 is on the decline, but in and out of the USA; e.g.,
signs that India may switch from CDMA2000 to GSM.

--
Best regards, FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS:
John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>

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  #9 (permalink)  
Old 12-08-2006, 10:24 PM
SMS
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S.countries."

Dennis Ferguson wrote:

> That's a little bogus. I'm not positive but I don't think any Verizon or
> Sprint phone will roam in Japan, I think the CDMA frequency assignments in
> Japan are different.


Soon. Samsung has a phone that works, and there is already CDMA roaming
for Korean users in Japan.

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  #10 (permalink)  
Old 12-09-2006, 12:11 AM
Double Tap
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."


"Joel Kolstad" <JKolstad71HatesSpam@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:12njd9i6m51h090@corp.supernews.com...
> "SMS" <scharf.steven@geemail.com> wrote in message
> news:4578a722$0$82615$742ec2ed@news.sonic.net...
>> "Both T-Mobile and Cingular had an advantage not available for Verizon
>> and Sprint users: their GSM-based phones can usually be used in many
>> non-U.S. countries, CR observed."

>
> "Usually" is probably rather overstated: Unless someone specifically
> purchased an unlocked phone from their U.S.-based GSM carrier, I'd say the
> odds of the average person having such a phone is perhaps... 1 in 10?


Absolutely incorrect. You do not need an unlocked phone to have service.
If your phone functions on the 900/1800/1900 GSM frequency bands and your
local service provider has a roaming agreement with the overseas provider
your phone will work. However you per minute cost might be through the roof,
so by having an unlocked phone you can purchase a local SIM card and get
much better rates.
>
> Granted, trying to use a CDMA phone outside the U.S. is probably a 1 in
> 1000 shot; I'd be surprised if we could find anyone who has successfully
> taken, e.g., a Sprint phone and gotten it to work in, say, Japan. But
> perhaps I'm horribly mistaken...
>
>
>
>




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  #11 (permalink)  
Old 12-09-2006, 02:14 AM
james g. keegan jr.
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

In article <pqrjn2dn2a6l66c0prbgkuokluu0n6sjej@4ax.com>,
John Navas <spamfilter0@navasgroup.com> wrote:

> On Fri, 08 Dec 2006 12:10:02 -0800, SMS <scharf.steven@geemail.com>
> wrote in <4579c6a4$0$82534$742ec2ed@news.sonic.net>:
>
> >... However the story is different in Korea, where
> >it's relatively easy to use a CDMA phone, as well as in China, India,
> >etc. New CDMA networks are being deployed in a lot of countries, and
> >coverage is expanding in existing countries. It's not that these
> >countries were so keen on a second standard, but in the densely
> >populated countries, they needed the higher efficiency of CDMA.

>
> In fact CDMA2000 is on the decline, but in and out of the USA; e.g.,
> signs that India may switch from CDMA2000 to GSM.


in fact, cdma is the fastest growing technology in china. you need to
stop talking about things you are ignorant of, john. doing so, as you
do often lately, makes you look silly and lessens your credibility to
speak to any subject you might know something about.

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  #12 (permalink)  
Old 12-09-2006, 04:05 AM
sw
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

In article <jgkeegan-CC377F.22141708122006@individual.net>,
"james g. keegan jr." <jgkeegan@gmail.com> wrote:

> In article <pqrjn2dn2a6l66c0prbgkuokluu0n6sjej@4ax.com>,
> John Navas <spamfilter0@navasgroup.com> wrote:
>
> > On Fri, 08 Dec 2006 12:10:02 -0800, SMS <scharf.steven@geemail.com>
> > wrote in <4579c6a4$0$82534$742ec2ed@news.sonic.net>:
> >
> > >... However the story is different in Korea, where
> > >it's relatively easy to use a CDMA phone, as well as in China, India,
> > >etc. New CDMA networks are being deployed in a lot of countries, and
> > >coverage is expanding in existing countries. It's not that these
> > >countries were so keen on a second standard, but in the densely
> > >populated countries, they needed the higher efficiency of CDMA.

> >
> > In fact CDMA2000 is on the decline, but in and out of the USA; e.g.,
> > signs that India may switch from CDMA2000 to GSM.

>
> in fact, cdma is the fastest growing technology in china. you need to
> stop talking about things you are ignorant of, john. doing so, as you
> do often lately, makes you look silly and lessens your credibility to
> speak to any subject you might know something about.


Anus navas worships Nokia. Whatever Nokia claims or says must be right.
Actually, this is another case of navas cut and paste.

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  #13 (permalink)  
Old 12-09-2006, 05:34 AM
Todd Allcock
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

At 08 Dec 2006 10:55:44 -0800 Joel Kolstad wrote:

> > "Both T-Mobile and Cingular had an advantage not available for
> > Verizon and Sprint users: their GSM-based phones can usually be
> > used in many non-U.S. countries, CR observed."

>
> "Usually" is probably rather overstated: Unless someone specifically
> purchased an unlocked phone from their U.S.-based GSM carrier, I'd
> say the odds of the average person having such a phone is perhaps...
> 1 in 10?



Others have pointed out it's pretty easy to get a phone unlocked by
Cingular or T-Mo, but forgetting that, an unlocked phone is NOT required
for international roaming- both Cingular and T-Mobile have roaming
agreements with other GSM carriers worldwide. The rates are certainly
high vs. using prepaid SIMs abroad, but they require no hassles on the
users part- dial the customer's US cellular number and it rings wherever
(albeit for $1-5/minute depending on location!)




--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


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  #14 (permalink)  
Old 12-09-2006, 04:53 PM
carcarx
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

John Navas wrote:
> On Fri, 08 Dec 2006 12:10:02 -0800, SMS <scharf.steven@geemail.com>
> wrote in <4579c6a4$0$82534$742ec2ed@news.sonic.net>:


> In fact CDMA2000 is on the decline, but in and out of the USA; e.g.,
> signs that India may switch from CDMA2000 to GSM.


And then, again, they may not. (The roaming revenue from the overseas
GSM users is hard not to go after, so lets get enough of a network
going
so we can rake in the roaming revenue! Aren't free markets great?)


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  #15 (permalink)  
Old 12-09-2006, 05:18 PM
carcarx
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

John Navas wrote:

> CDMA2000 is actually on the decline, with Nokia having abandoned it,


Here're two of Nokia's new phones for VerizonWireless (cdma2000 EV-DO)

http://www.nokiausa.com/phones/6315i/0,7747,,00.html
http://www.nokiausa.com/phones/6305i/0,7747,,00.html

There are more cdma2000 phone on the Nokia USA web site.
Look for model numbers ending in "i".
So, obviously, Nokia hasn't abandoned cdma2000.


> and even Qualcomm is hedging its bets.

How, by taking advantage of revenue they could gain by leveraging
their intellectual property and give stockholders dividends by
producing
W-CDMA chips, or by buying an OFDM patent bearing company, and buying
Bluetooth
and WiFi companies? Qualcomm is aiming to be a behemoth in wireless
(can you blame them?), and is making a lot of money selling wireless
chipsets.

Aren't truly free markets great?

> Kindly take your CDMA2000 trolling someplace else.


cdma450 demonstrates, even in Europe, that European government policies
can't totally "snuff out" the free market, although a Swedish carrier
who wanted to
offer cdma450 was denied permission to do so by the government. cdma450
is blooming
where it fills a market need. More carriers around the world are
expanding their cdma2000 markets. And, where cdma2000 and W-CDMA
compete head-to-head NTT DoCoMo lost
subscribers due to wireless number portability. (They lost them to
cdma2000 operator
KDDI.)

You accuse him of being the troll? You've demonstrated that you haven't
researched your conjectures and are also indicating that you anti
free-market and pro-government regulation. Why?


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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 12-09-2006, 07:57 PM
Todd Allcock
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

At 09 Dec 2006 10:18:46 -0800 carcarx wrote:
>
> Here're two of Nokia's new phones for VerizonWireless (cdma2000 EV-DO)
>
> http://www.nokiausa.com/phones/6315i/0,7747,,00.html
> http://www.nokiausa.com/phones/6305i/0,7747,,00.html
>
> There are more cdma2000 phone on the Nokia USA web site.
> Look for model numbers ending in "i".
> So, obviously, Nokia hasn't abandoned cdma2000.


Nokia has stopped producing new CDMA handsets. According to an article I
read a couple of months ago, they are now having their CDMA phones built
for them by two companies, Pantech and someone else I've forgotten
(Samsung maybe?) So the only thing Nokia is building for CDMA phones
going forward is their logo!



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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 12-09-2006, 11:26 PM
james g. keegan jr.
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

In article <nospam-CDD256.23053708122006@news-fe-03.texas.rr.com>,
sw <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:

> In article <jgkeegan-CC377F.22141708122006@individual.net>,
> "james g. keegan jr." <jgkeegan@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > In article <pqrjn2dn2a6l66c0prbgkuokluu0n6sjej@4ax.com>,
> > John Navas <spamfilter0@navasgroup.com> wrote:
> >
> > > On Fri, 08 Dec 2006 12:10:02 -0800, SMS <scharf.steven@geemail.com>
> > > wrote in <4579c6a4$0$82534$742ec2ed@news.sonic.net>:
> > >
> > > >... However the story is different in Korea, where
> > > >it's relatively easy to use a CDMA phone, as well as in China, India,
> > > >etc. New CDMA networks are being deployed in a lot of countries, and
> > > >coverage is expanding in existing countries. It's not that these
> > > >countries were so keen on a second standard, but in the densely
> > > >populated countries, they needed the higher efficiency of CDMA.
> > >
> > > In fact CDMA2000 is on the decline, but in and out of the USA; e.g.,
> > > signs that India may switch from CDMA2000 to GSM.

> >
> > in fact, cdma is the fastest growing technology in china. you need to
> > stop talking about things you are ignorant of, john. doing so, as you
> > do often lately, makes you look silly and lessens your credibility to
> > speak to any subject you might know something about.

>
> Anus navas worships Nokia. Whatever Nokia claims or says must be right.
> Actually, this is another case of navas cut and paste.


i admit it .... i am astounded at the volume of incorrect information
he puts out.

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  #18 (permalink)  
Old 12-12-2006, 03:54 PM
Joel Kolstad
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

"Double Tap" <doubletap@37.com> wrote in message
news:g3oeh.8186$sf5.1878@newsread4.news.pas.earthl ink.net...
> Absolutely incorrect. You do not need an unlocked phone to have service.
> If your phone functions on the 900/1800/1900 GSM frequency bands and your
> local service provider has a roaming agreement with the overseas provider
> your phone will work. However you per minute cost might be through the roof,
> so by having an unlocked phone you can purchase a local SIM card and get
> much better rates.


Yes, thanks for the clarification. I was thinking of the "buying a pre-paid
SIM" approach for overseas use, and thinking that was going to work perhaps 1
time in 10.

My mother spends most of her time in New Zealand these days. She has one of
the Sprint/Samsung CDMA/GSM phones (SCH-A790), which shes uses with a pre-paid
Vodafone SIM in NZ. Interestingly, the phone will roam in CDMA mode on
Telecom NZ's network... but the rates are outrageous, and you say.



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  #19 (permalink)  
Old 12-12-2006, 04:26 PM
SMS
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S.countries."

Joel Kolstad wrote:

> My mother spends most of her time in New Zealand these days. She has one of
> the Sprint/Samsung CDMA/GSM phones (SCH-A790), which shes uses with a pre-paid
> Vodafone SIM in NZ. Interestingly, the phone will roam in CDMA mode on
> Telecom NZ's network... but the rates are outrageous, and you say.


Yeah, if you're interested in the most international roaming, without
prepaid SIMs but willing to pay the high roaming charges, then the
CDMA/GSM phones are definitely the best choice. Not only can you roam in
countries with no GSM at all, such as South Korea, but you can roam onto
both GSM and CDMA networks in countries that have both. This advantage
is increasing as CDMA networks in formerly GSM-only countries are being
greatly expanded. Alas, some of the new CDMA networks coming on-line
soon will be 450 MHz. It never ends.

I keep an unlocked 900/1800 GSM phone for use with prepaid SIMs in
Europe in parts of Asia. I have a lot of colleagues that tried to use
Cingular GSM with a tri-band 900/1800/1900 phone, back when Cingular was
1900 MHz only GSM in the west (and the rest of Cingular was TDMA), and
they gave up because the GSM coverage in the western region was
terrible, and the GSM roaming onto Voicestream (now T-Mobile) in the
rest of the country was expensive. Some of them have switched back to
Cingular now, using a quad-band phone, as the coverage is much improved
ever since the 800 MHz GSM deployment.

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  #20 (permalink)  
Old 12-12-2006, 11:04 PM
Mike Jacoubowsky
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

> Both T-Mobile and Cingular will unlock phones on request by customers in
> good standing.


Is this done while-you-wait at a company store, or does the phone need to be
sent in?

--Mike Jacoubowsky
Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReaction.com
Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA

"John Navas" <spamfilter0@navasgroup.com> wrote in message
news:cprjn29otgjhmirvasble196a2mkhmhjgi@4ax.com...
> On Fri, 8 Dec 2006 10:55:44 -0800, "Joel Kolstad"
> <JKolstad71HatesSpam@yahoo.com> wrote in
> <12njd9i6m51h090@corp.supernews.com>:
>
>>"SMS" <scharf.steven@geemail.com> wrote in message
>>news:4578a722$0$82615$742ec2ed@news.sonic.net. ..
>>> "Both T-Mobile and Cingular had an advantage not available for Verizon
>>> and
>>> Sprint users: their GSM-based phones can usually be used in many
>>> non-U.S.
>>> countries, CR observed."

>>
>>"Usually" is probably rather overstated: Unless someone specifically
>>purchased
>>an unlocked phone from their U.S.-based GSM carrier, I'd say the odds of
>>the
>>average person having such a phone is perhaps... 1 in 10?

>
> Both T-Mobile and Cingular will unlock phones on request by customers in
> good standing.
>
> --
> Best regards, FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS:
> John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>
>




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  #21 (permalink)  
Old 12-13-2006, 02:20 AM
Todd Allcock
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

At 13 Dec 2006 00:04:24 +0000 Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
> > Both T-Mobile and Cingular will unlock phones on request by customers
> > in good standing.

>
> Is this done while-you-wait at a company store, or does the phone need
> to be sent in?



Neither- generally you call them and they give you a gazillion-digit code
you type into the phone to remove the subsidy lock.


--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


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  #22 (permalink)  
Old 12-13-2006, 10:29 AM
dafydd
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

Actually, at aleast if it is a T-mobile phone, 1st a call is made to
customer care from a phone other than your cell, so that you can give
them the 15 digit IMEI number from your cell. The representative fills
out a for and sends it off to the research department to get the
Subsidy Unlock code, which typically is then emailed to the email
addreess you provided duringg your call. The turn around time is
usually about 24 hours, unless they donot have it on file and have to
send off to the manufacturer for it. If you donot get an email from
them one way or other within 72 hours you should call, as sometimes,
the email address gets mis-typed. They can give you the instructions
over the phone.

> Is this done while-you-wait at a company store, or does the phone need to be
> sent in?
>



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  #23 (permalink)  
Old 12-23-2006, 12:46 AM
John Navas
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

On 9 Dec 2006 10:18:46 -0800, "carcarx" <carcarx@hotmail.com> wrote in
<1165688326.282543.270550@n67g2000cwd.googlegroups .com>:

>John Navas wrote:
>
>> CDMA2000 is actually on the decline, with Nokia having abandoned it,

>
>Here're two of Nokia's new phones for VerizonWireless (cdma2000 EV-DO)
>
>http://www.nokiausa.com/phones/6315i/0,7747,,00.html
>http://www.nokiausa.com/phones/6305i/0,7747,,00.html
>
>There are more cdma2000 phone on the Nokia USA web site.
>Look for model numbers ending in "i".
>So, obviously, Nokia hasn't abandoned cdma2000.


<http://www.mobiledia.com/news/47935.html>

Nokia and Sanyo announced today that they will not be forming the new
CDMA device company preliminarily announced in February.

The Finnish company said on it would pull out of CDMA phone
manufacturing, which it sees as a shrinking market in the longer
term. Recent developments may indicate that the CDMA emerging markets
business is looking more challenging.

<http://www.networkworld.com/news/2006/081106-nokia-to-lay-off-us.html>

Nokia will cut a few hundred jobs as it shuts down its CDMA handset
development.

The company has been developing CDMA (Code-Division Multiple Access)
products at a facility in San Diego but is now turning to ODMs
(original device manufacturers) for all its CDMA phones. It expects
to eliminate about 600 jobs in the process, cutting a work force of
about 1,150 to roughly 550, said spokesman Keith Nowak. In the
future, the San Diego unit will work with the ODMs and also help to
develop Nokia GSM (Global System for Mobile Communications) and UMTS
(Universal Mobile Telecommunications System) products.

Apology accepted.

--
Best regards, FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS:
John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>

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  #24 (permalink)  
Old 12-23-2006, 12:47 AM
John Navas
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

On Wed, 13 Dec 2006 00:04:24 GMT, "Mike Jacoubowsky"
<MikeJ@ChainReaction.com> wrote in
<csHfh.1954$yC5.83@newssvr27.news.prodigy.net>:

>> Both T-Mobile and Cingular will unlock phones on request by customers in
>> good standing.

>
>Is this done while-you-wait at a company store, or does the phone need to be
>sent in?


The unlock code is given to you.

--
Best regards, FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS:
John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>

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  #25 (permalink)  
Old 12-23-2006, 01:52 AM
Walt Kienzle
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

It is done through e-mail initiated by a phone call to customer service. I
did this recently for both my Cingular and T-Mobile phones. Cingular
responded with the code in 4 days, T-Mobile responded in about 20 hours.

On par with Cingular service, they provided instructions that didn't work
properly. I had to call them a couple of times before I reached someone
that stumbled upon the proper procedure to unlock my Siemens phone.

Walt Kienzle

"John Navas" <spamfilter0@navasgroup.com> wrote in message
news:di2po2hr2m3cjkb21vvok8fg7qt6jp0fov@4ax.com...
> On Wed, 13 Dec 2006 00:04:24 GMT, "Mike Jacoubowsky"
> <MikeJ@ChainReaction.com> wrote in
> <csHfh.1954$yC5.83@newssvr27.news.prodigy.net>:
>
>>> Both T-Mobile and Cingular will unlock phones on request by customers in
>>> good standing.

>>
>>Is this done while-you-wait at a company store, or does the phone need to
>>be
>>sent in?




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  #26 (permalink)  
Old 12-23-2006, 03:37 AM
Ness net
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

Piss off John. Absolutely no apology offered - or is needed.

Nokia chose to go it's own way and (try to) develop it's own CDMA chips.
And did a fairly ****** job of it - thus it's just cutting it's losses now because
they did a such a completely lousy job at CDMA on their own.

Certainly, you can spin this, twist reality and believe what you want. Using this
to further push your absolutely bogus argument (CDMA is in decline) is however
completely false and frankly asinine. And again shows how delusional you are.

And, it certainly doesn't change the actual TRUTH.

Which is that CDMA is actually growing, not declining, as you always falsely
contend.


"John Navas" <spamfilter0@navasgroup.com> wrote in message news:u92po2l952oep0ss2q779fn557gj2mvpnr@4ax.com...
> On 9 Dec 2006 10:18:46 -0800, "carcarx" <carcarx@hotmail.com> wrote in
> <1165688326.282543.270550@n67g2000cwd.googlegroups .com>:
>
>>John Navas wrote:
>>
>>> CDMA2000 is actually on the decline, with Nokia having abandoned it,

>>
>>Here're two of Nokia's new phones for VerizonWireless (cdma2000 EV-DO)
>>
>>http://www.nokiausa.com/phones/6315i/0,7747,,00.html
>>http://www.nokiausa.com/phones/6305i/0,7747,,00.html
>>
>>There are more cdma2000 phone on the Nokia USA web site.
>>Look for model numbers ending in "i".
>>So, obviously, Nokia hasn't abandoned cdma2000.

>
> <http://www.mobiledia.com/news/47935.html>
>
> Nokia and Sanyo announced today that they will not be forming the new
> CDMA device company preliminarily announced in February.
>
> The Finnish company said on it would pull out of CDMA phone
> manufacturing, which it sees as a shrinking market in the longer
> term. Recent developments may indicate that the CDMA emerging markets
> business is looking more challenging.
>
> <http://www.networkworld.com/news/2006/081106-nokia-to-lay-off-us.html>
>
> Nokia will cut a few hundred jobs as it shuts down its CDMA handset
> development.
>
> The company has been developing CDMA (Code-Division Multiple Access)
> products at a facility in San Diego but is now turning to ODMs
> (original device manufacturers) for all its CDMA phones. It expects
> to eliminate about 600 jobs in the process, cutting a work force of
> about 1,150 to roughly 550, said spokesman Keith Nowak. In the
> future, the San Diego unit will work with the ODMs and also help to
> develop Nokia GSM (Global System for Mobile Communications) and UMTS
> (Universal Mobile Telecommunications System) products.
>
> Apology accepted.
>
> --
> Best regards, FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS:
> John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>




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  #27 (permalink)  
Old 12-23-2006, 11:42 PM
John Navas
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

Be more careful when quoting, Walt -- you put me in your header, but
deleted my remarks, making it look like I posted something I didn't
write. To respond to Make, follow-up to Mike's posting, not my
response. Also, don't switch posting styles (top vs bottom) in
mid-thread -- it's confusing. Thanks.

On Sat, 23 Dec 2006 02:52:34 GMT, "Walt Kienzle" <wkienzle@core.com>
wrote in <SR0jh.5790$yC5.2534@newssvr27.news.prodigy.net> :

>It is done through e-mail initiated by a phone call to customer service. I
>did this recently for both my Cingular and T-Mobile phones. Cingular
>responded with the code in 4 days, T-Mobile responded in about 20 hours.
>
>On par with Cingular service, they provided instructions that didn't work
>properly. I had to call them a couple of times before I reached someone
>that stumbled upon the proper procedure to unlock my Siemens phone.
>
>Walt Kienzle
>
>"John Navas" <spamfilter0@navasgroup.com> wrote in message
>news:di2po2hr2m3cjkb21vvok8fg7qt6jp0fov@4ax.com.. .
>> On Wed, 13 Dec 2006 00:04:24 GMT, "Mike Jacoubowsky"
>> <MikeJ@ChainReaction.com> wrote in
>> <csHfh.1954$yC5.83@newssvr27.news.prodigy.net>:
>>
>>>> Both T-Mobile and Cingular will unlock phones on request by customers in
>>>> good standing.
>>>
>>>Is this done while-you-wait at a company store, or does the phone need to
>>>be
>>>sent in?

>


--
Best regards, FAQ FOR CINGULAR WIRELESS:
John Navas <http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cingular_Wireless_FAQ>

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  #28 (permalink)  
Old 12-24-2006, 12:32 AM
Mori
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S. countries."

John Navas <spamfilter0@navasgroup.com> wrote message
news:gtiro25s01tig29jvernol9jcfdqed2i83@4ax.com:

> Also, don't switch posting
> styles (top vs bottom) in mid-thread -- it's confusing.
> Thanks.


And a bit of 'snipping' helps clear up and straighten out replies.


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  #29 (permalink)  
Old 12-24-2006, 01:46 PM
SMS
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S.countries."

Ness net wrote:

> Which is that CDMA is actually growing, not declining, as you always falsely
> contend.


It's not just the growth, it's the installed base as well. CDMA is the
leading technology in the U.S., with well over half the existing users.
Nokia is writing off a total available market of more than 100 million
users in the U.S. alone.

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  #30 (permalink)  
Old 12-24-2006, 01:53 PM
George
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: TechWeb: "GSM Based phones can usually be used in many non-U.S.countries."

SMS wrote:
> Ness net wrote:
>
>> Which is that CDMA is actually growing, not declining, as you always
>> falsely
>> contend.

>
> It's not just the growth, it's the installed base as well. CDMA is the
> leading technology in the U.S., with well over half the existing users.
> Nokia is writing off a total available market of more than 100 million
> users in the U.S. alone.


For sure, Nokia just couldn't make a good CDMA handset and apparently
decided to give up trying.

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