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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 07-02-2008, 05:17 AM
David G. Imber
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default iPhone Negatives?

I'm not posting this to be provocative, believe me.

I'm going to need a new phone shortly, I'd like it to have
more capabilities than my present handset. I have specific wishes,
such as being able to do e-mail and access the web in Japanese.

At the moment, the upcoming iPhone 3G seems like an
exceptionally good option. I'm not typically a fan of Apple, I should
add.

Many here are far better versed than I am in the subject of
wireless communication, and I also find that many here disparage the
iPhone.

One reason I can imagine for this is the carrier that the
device is associated with, AT&T, which has a mediocre reputation at
best. Another is the fact that one cannot replace the battery oneself.
I know that many favor hardware keyboards over touch screens.

But is there more? Are there more compelling reasons that I
should be wary of switching to the iPhone? I've been a Sprint customer
for 9 years. It recently began to become apparent that receiving mail
on my handset would be helpful. But since some portion of my mail is
in Japanese, and NO ONE at Sprint could answer whether any Sprint
phone is capable of handling Japanese characters, choosing from among
their present selection is nearly impossible.

The exception here is the line of RIM phones. But to use
Japanese on a Blackberry requires a third party application/hack, as
far as I know.

Any insights are very welcome, and I thank you in advance.

DGI


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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 07-02-2008, 07:36 PM
David Moyer
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: iPhone Negatives?

David G. Imber <imber@maniform.com> wrote:

> Many here are far better versed than I am in the subject of
> wireless communication, and I also find that many here disparage the
> iPhone.


only because they are fearful of how good it actually is...

> One reason I can imagine for this is the carrier that the
> device is associated with, AT&T, which has a mediocre reputation at
> best.


yes, that's about 40% of it... but as with any carrier, it mostly
depends on where you live / work in relation to their towers, not the
carrier itself.

> Another is the fact that one cannot replace the battery oneself.


nah, that's a pure myth, you can replace the iphone battery yourself,
it's only $15 but remember it's very, very unlikely you'll ever need to
replace it since apple put in an enormous, long lasting battery, it
should last 4 years or so without replacement.

http://www.hyratech.com/product.php?productid=6828

> I know that many favor hardware keyboards over touch screens.


and that's only because they have never used the iphone keyboard, which
consistently ranks higher than the physical ones and by far the best
virtual keyboard you're going to find on any electronic device. it's a
dream to use and does all the chinese, japanese characters as well. (see
the 3G iphone tour)

> But is there more? Are there more compelling reasons that I
> should be wary of switching to the iPhone? I've been a Sprint customer
> for 9 years. It recently began to become apparent that receiving mail
> on my handset would be helpful. But since some portion of my mail is
> in Japanese, and NO ONE at Sprint could answer whether any Sprint
> phone is capable of handling Japanese characters, choosing from among
> their present selection is nearly impossible.
>
> The exception here is the line of RIM phones. But to use
> Japanese on a Blackberry requires a third party application/hack, as
> far as I know.
>
> Any insights are very welcome, and I thank you in advance.


just watch the tour, it will answer most of your questions... view it in
Large or at least Medium size for the full effect.

http://www.apple.com/iphone/guidedtour/

enjoy your iPhone!

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  #3 (permalink)  
Old 07-02-2008, 11:34 PM
The Bob
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: iPhone Negatives?

David Moyer <meetme@world.com> amazed us all with the following in
news:meetme-1FE476.13360302072008@dialup-
4.167.115.65.Dial1.Houston1.Level3.net:

> David G. Imber <imber@maniform.com> wrote:
>
>> Many here are far better versed than I am in the subject of
>> wireless communication, and I also find that many here disparage the
>> iPhone.

>
> only because they are fearful of how good it actually is...


It's a toy.

>
>> One reason I can imagine for this is the carrier that the
>> device is associated with, AT&T, which has a mediocre reputation at
>> best.

>
> yes, that's about 40% of it... but as with any carrier, it mostly
> depends on where you live / work in relation to their towers, not the
> carrier itself.
>
>> Another is the fact that one cannot replace the battery oneself.

>
> nah, that's a pure myth, you can replace the iphone battery yourself,
> it's only $15 but remember it's very, very unlikely you'll ever need to
> replace it since apple put in an enormous, long lasting battery, it
> should last 4 years or so without replacement.


And void any warranty by cracking open the case.

BTW- use of a soldering iron does not constitute "user replaceable" for
many folks.



>



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  #4 (permalink)  
Old 07-03-2008, 02:10 AM
David G. Imber
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: iPhone Negatives?

On Wed, 02 Jul 2008 18:34:41 -0500, The Bob <nospam@bob.com> wrote:

>David Moyer <meetme@world.com> amazed us all with the following in
>news:meetme-1FE476.13360302072008@dialup-
>4.167.115.65.Dial1.Houston1.Level3.net:
>
>> David G. Imber <imber@maniform.com> wrote:
>>
>>> Many here are far better versed than I am in the subject of
>>> wireless communication, and I also find that many here disparage the
>>> iPhone.

>>
>> only because they are fearful of how good it actually is...

>
>It's a toy.


Slightly off the point, but I have to say that I simply ignore
comments like this.

A few weeks ago I inquired in an honest, open way about
something I'd seen on a presumably doctored video (it had to do with
wireless telecom and it was on this group). I kept getting responses
like "it's a hoax".

That sort of reply doesn't make a curious, intelligent person
back off and say "whoa, I guess you must be right", and leave it at
that. An intelligent, inquisitive person looks at a response like that
and says that the respondent probably doesn't have any real knowledge.

I am not an Apple fan, and I've had only limited exposure to
the first generation iPhones.

But I don't think it's quite reasonable to refer to the device
as "a toy". If you'd even written "it feels like a toy" I'd say "fair
enough". Versions of the Mac OS prior to the current one felt totally
like a toy OS to me.

I'm quite sure that the iPhone has been rigorously tested to
conform to basic technology standards. Where it falls on that spectrum
is what I'm asking about. I want to know what voice quality is like,
how well it holds a signal, etc.

If you can prove that the iPhone is in any viable sense a
"toy" and not a tool for telecommunications I'm all ears. I really
don't think that's possible if you have a clear definition of the word
"toy".

DGI


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  #5 (permalink)  
Old 07-03-2008, 02:57 AM
The Bob
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: iPhone Negatives?

David G. Imber <imber@maniform.com> amazed us all with the following in
newslco64te171o2qb50vapg97jhntt0bquog@4ax.com:

> On Wed, 02 Jul 2008 18:34:41 -0500, The Bob <nospam@bob.com> wrote:
>
>>David Moyer <meetme@world.com> amazed us all with the following in
>>news:meetme-1FE476.13360302072008@dialup-
>>4.167.115.65.Dial1.Houston1.Level3.net:
>>
>>> David G. Imber <imber@maniform.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Many here are far better versed than I am in the subject of
>>>> wireless communication, and I also find that many here disparage

the
>>>> iPhone.
>>>
>>> only because they are fearful of how good it actually is...

>>
>>It's a toy.

>
> Slightly off the point, but I have to say that I simply ignore
> comments like this.
>
> A few weeks ago I inquired in an honest, open way about
> something I'd seen on a presumably doctored video (it had to do with
> wireless telecom and it was on this group). I kept getting responses
> like "it's a hoax".
>
> That sort of reply doesn't make a curious, intelligent person
> back off and say "whoa, I guess you must be right", and leave it at
> that. An intelligent, inquisitive person looks at a response like that
> and says that the respondent probably doesn't have any real knowledge.
>
> I am not an Apple fan, and I've had only limited exposure to
> the first generation iPhones.
>
> But I don't think it's quite reasonable to refer to the device
> as "a toy". If you'd even written "it feels like a toy" I'd say "fair
> enough". Versions of the Mac OS prior to the current one felt totally
> like a toy OS to me.
>
> I'm quite sure that the iPhone has been rigorously tested to
> conform to basic technology standards. Where it falls on that spectrum
> is what I'm asking about. I want to know what voice quality is like,
> how well it holds a signal, etc.
>
> If you can prove that the iPhone is in any viable sense a
> "toy" and not a tool for telecommunications I'm all ears. I really
> don't think that's possible if you have a clear definition of the word
> "toy".
>
> DGI
>
>


No voice dialing
No MMS
No expandable memory
Limited bluetooth functionality

But it's got a really cool screen and plays music and videos real good!

It's big on the things that a phone doesn't need and very much lacking
in the things a phone should have.

It's a toy.

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  #6 (permalink)  
Old 07-03-2008, 09:57 AM
David G. Imber
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: iPhone Negatives?


I appreciate your clarification. Just to pursue the
discussion:


On Wed, 02 Jul 2008 21:57:57 -0500, The Bob <nospam@bob.com> wrote:

>
>No voice dialing
>No MMS


I have never used voice dialing in my life - just a preference
I suppose. Regarding MMS, the iPhone, as I understand it, has
extensive web access and mail attachment capabilities. I have never
used MMS functions on any of my phones, nor have I felt the need for a
Vision plan (I work from home, so rarely need a phone to perform
multimedia functions of any sort, except for amusement, which isn't
much a part of my program). Nevertheless, between mail attachments and
web services, should the need ever arise, I could simulate any
functionality MMS offers with this device, I believe.

>No expandable memory


If I'm almost exclusively focused on telephonic and transient
mail activity, perhaps a bit of web use, why would I have to exceed
the max memory?

>Limited bluetooth functionality


Could be an issue, but can't say precisely without knowing
details.
>
>But it's got a really cool screen and plays music and videos real good!


I have no interest in music or videos, but could see amusing
myself with either upon occasion. If it's just gravy, then whatever,
who cares?

As for "cool" screen. The use of the word "cool" is editorial
on your part. It has a high-quality, well-resolved display. Everyone
knows that. Surely you can't see that as a negative. Why would anyone
see a good display as a negative?

>
>It's big on the things that a phone doesn't need and very much lacking
>in the things a phone should have.


What a phone needs is the ability to capture and hold a
signal, and transmit sound well in both directions. That is what I use
a phone for. In this case it will ADDITIONALLY retrieve mail and text
messages for me, and allow me to access the web. The network should
offer very wide and consistent coverage. Customer service and whatnot
should be acceptable or better.

You did not address any of these issues. It seems as though
you yourself are more concerned with non-telephony matters than I am.

>It's a toy.


When a person feels the need to repeat phrases that express
their attitude about a subject, when that attitude is already quite
evident, without providing any additional information, it suggests
there is either more or less to their argument than they are letting
be known.

DGI



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  #7 (permalink)  
Old 07-03-2008, 08:15 PM
Larry
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: iPhone Negatives?

David G. Imber <imber@maniform.com> wrote in
news:mf7p64ll0uio1o0u7bdk3i3ttst43pif37@4ax.com:

>
>>Limited bluetooth functionality

>
> Could be an issue, but can't say precisely without knowing
> details.
>


What good is a phone you can't use as a BT modem for your laptop of
Nokia Linux internet tablet??


How silly.....



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  #8 (permalink)  
Old 07-03-2008, 10:52 PM
The Bob
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: iPhone Negatives?

David G. Imber <imber@maniform.com> amazed us all with the following in
news:mf7p64ll0uio1o0u7bdk3i3ttst43pif37@4ax.com:

>
> I appreciate your clarification. Just to pursue the
> discussion:
>
>
> On Wed, 02 Jul 2008 21:57:57 -0500, The Bob <nospam@bob.com> wrote:
>
>>
>>No voice dialing
>>No MMS

>
> I have never used voice dialing in my life - just a preference



Depending upon your jurisdiction, your view of this may change as laws
limiting handheld use go on the books.

> I suppose. Regarding MMS, the iPhone, as I understand it, has
> extensive web access and mail attachment capabilities. I have never
> used MMS functions on any of my phones, nor have I felt the need for a
> Vision plan (I work from home, so rarely need a phone to perform
> multimedia functions of any sort, except for amusement, which isn't
> much a part of my program). Nevertheless, between mail attachments and
> web services, should the need ever arise, I could simulate any
> functionality MMS offers with this device, I believe.


As long as the party you are communicating can handle that, you're fine.
I find MMS handy for communicating with those that may not have the
laptop fired up and who set their phone up as justy that- a phone. It
also comes in handy when mutitasking- a quick message in this fashion is
sometimes the easiest way to communicate when on a conference call or if
the computer is running something complex.

>
>>No expandable memory

>
> If I'm almost exclusively focused on telephonic and transient
> mail activity, perhaps a bit of web use, why would I have to exceed
> the max memory?


Well, given the new facts you've placed into evidence, you wouldn't.

>
>>Limited bluetooth functionality

>
> Could be an issue, but can't say precisely without knowing
> details.


>
>>But it's got a really cool screen and plays music and videos real

good!
>
> I have no interest in music or videos, but could see amusing
> myself with either upon occasion. If it's just gravy, then whatever,
> who cares?
>
> As for "cool" screen. The use of the word "cool" is editorial
> on your part.



Actually, it was pure sarcasm, but I agree with you.

> It has a high-quality, well-resolved display. Everyone
> knows that. Surely you can't see that as a negative. Why would anyone
> see a good display as a negative?


My comment was really directed at the fact that this is the one feature
that gets all of the press. And if you are using the phone as you
describe, then the display becomes less of a selling point. Many phones
on the market have good displays.

>
>>
>>It's big on the things that a phone doesn't need and very much lacking
>>in the things a phone should have.

>
> What a phone needs is the ability to capture and hold a
> signal, and transmit sound well in both directions. That is what I use
> a phone for.


Well, then the tinny sound of the phone would probably be a
consideration for you. The actual sound quality is not on a par with
most other phones.



> In this case it will ADDITIONALLY retrieve mail and text
> messages for me, and allow me to access the web. The network should
> offer very wide and consistent coverage.


Then another consideration for you would be this- of the big three
carriers (AT&T, Verizon and Sprint), the AT&T 3g network is the smallest
geographically by a couple of million square miles in comparison to the
other two. The fanbois will try to argue this, but all you need to do
is compare coverage maps of the broadband networks to realize this.

> Customer service and whatnot
> should be acceptable or better.
>
> You did not address any of these issues. It seems as though
> you yourself are more concerned with non-telephony matters than I am.



I am quite concerned about telephony matters, as you can now see. You
asked for justification of the "toy" phrase. I provided it, and have
now talked about the shortcomings of the product as a telephony device.
In other words, I gave you exactly what you asked for the first time,
and you drew the misguided conclusion that it was all there was to the
subject.

>
>>It's a toy.

>
> When a person feels the need to repeat phrases that express
> their attitude about a subject, when that attitude is already quite
> evident, without providing any additional information, it suggests
> there is either more or less to their argument than they are letting
> be known.


Read the archives and you'll see that there is no hidden agenda on my
part. I have very vocal from the start that the iPhone is not the
Second Coming all of the Apple fanbois in these groups boldly claim it
to be. It is at best a mediocre phone and lacks many features found on
even the most basic of phones. The features that are touted by the
Apple masses are not communications related, but entertainment related.
Over a year after the inital rollout and Apple is still playing catchup
in a market sector that is mature and holds no surprises. To me, it is
the classic example of poor design and lousy R&D, a product selling only
because of the name on the cover.

>
> DGI
>
>
>



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  #9 (permalink)  
Old 07-04-2008, 03:40 AM
David G. Imber
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: iPhone Negatives?


Now I'm getting it! With this post you've given me a lot to
think about. I'll admit that I'm disappointed that you weren't just
blowing smoke. I'd hoped that the iPhone was more promising for a
reason that I'll make clear at the end.

My big take-aways here are "tinny sound, poor network".


On Thu, 03 Jul 2008 17:52:11 -0500, The Bob <nospam@bob.com> wrote:


>>>No voice dialing
>>>No MMS

>>
>> I have never used voice dialing in my life - just a preference

>
>
>Depending upon your jurisdiction, your view of this may change as laws
>limiting handheld use go on the books.


I assume you're talking about driving. In my area handhelds
while driving are forbidden, but then, I don't own a car. I live in
Manhattan. On the rare occasions I have to rent one and drive
somewhere it's never been an issue. My Sanyo's have all had excellent
speakerphones. (I've been using Sanyo phones for the past 8 years).

You give good cause to consider the lack of MMS, though I have
to say it doesn't really apply to my style of usage.


>Well, then the tinny sound of the phone would probably be a
>consideration for you. The actual sound quality is not on a par with
>most other phones.


That's a bull's eye. I have rec'd. some calls from people on
their iPhones, and the sound was not especially good. But I didn't
have enough first-hand experience to say this was typical.

I'll take it as given that you've more experience with them
than I have, and this is a BIG negative for me, as is the following...


>of the big three
>carriers (AT&T, Verizon and Sprint), the AT&T 3g network is the smallest
>geographically by a couple of million square miles in comparison to the
>other two.


Not to be obscure about it, I'm a magazine writer. Most of my
work is done from my home in Manhattan. Therefore the actual phone
minutes I log per month are comparatively few. But when I'm on
assignment I rely totally on my phone (and presently a tiny
sub-notebook with a wi-fi card - as you can guess, my goal was to rid
myself of one of these).

My work takes me all over the US, and despite its detractors,
Sprint has always been extremely solid for me. I have no complaint
about the quality of the network, and I've done gigs in all regions of
the country and a bit in Canada.


>asked for justification of the "toy" phrase. I provided it, and have
>now talked about the shortcomings of the product as a telephony device.


You have. Thanks. I think I pushed you to be more explicit
than you'd planned, but it helped me think about this and I appreciate
it.

>Read the archives and you'll see that there is no hidden agenda on my
>part.


I got ya. I can argue some of the fine points (design is the
subject I write about, and functionality aside, the iPhone, like most
Apple products, does have much to commend it in this regard).

You've written plenty, and I thank you, but if you have a
recommendation on what I should be researching instead, I'll welcome
that too.

At present, the newest Blackberry (Bold) looks extremely good.
In fact it offers all the features of the iPhone, as far as I can tell
(it seems to have a full complement of multimedia capabilities, and as
I say, I wouldn't buy a phone for those, but wouldn't reject it for
them either). Sprint doesn't offer it yet.

But what it comes down to is whether I can do mail and web
access in Japanese. I won't bore you with the long history of being in
a very particular computing minority, but except back when I was in
college, where I used UNIX boxes, I've always been a DOS/Windows user.
I can say without qualification that MS has always given the finger to
those who need to do foreign character computing on a US system. The
company actually repeatedly broke Windows' ability to accommodate
various third party add-ons that benefited our specialized community.
It made us wait a year without any software work-arounds because it
was planning to bring out XP with a bad but functional multilingual
IME.

Apple has always taken the opposite view. From the very first
you could bounce back and forth between character systems, within the
same applications, same files. The company was rewarded with having
the biggest national market-share in the world among Japanese users.
Apple came out with an announcement recently that the iPhone 3G will
offer Japanese input automatically.

That's what started all this. I only wish that RIM would have
answered my inquiries about this.

Thanks again for taking the time to respond.

DGI


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  #10 (permalink)  
Old 07-06-2008, 07:10 AM
Oxford
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: iPhone Negatives?

The Bob <nospam@bob.com> wrote:

> > nah, that's a pure myth, you can replace the iphone battery yourself,
> > it's only $15 but remember it's very, very unlikely you'll ever need to
> > replace it since apple put in an enormous, long lasting battery, it
> > should last 4 years or so without replacement.

>
> And void any warranty by cracking open the case.


what? opening the case wouldn't void apple's warranty.

> BTW- use of a soldering iron does not constitute "user replaceable" for
> many folks.


but it's still user replaceable, you don't need to take it into Apple in
4 years is my point.

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  #11 (permalink)  
Old 07-06-2008, 07:34 AM
David Moyer
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: iPhone Negatives?

David G. Imber <imber@maniform.com> wrote:

> But what it comes down to is whether I can do mail and web
> access in Japanese. I won't bore you with the long history of being in
> a very particular computing minority, but except back when I was in
> college, where I used UNIX boxes, I've always been a DOS/Windows user.
> I can say without qualification that MS has always given the finger to
> those who need to do foreign character computing on a US system. The
> company actually repeatedly broke Windows' ability to accommodate
> various third party add-ons that benefited our specialized community.
> It made us wait a year without any software work-arounds because it
> was planning to bring out XP with a bad but functional multilingual
> IME.
>
> Apple has always taken the opposite view. From the very first
> you could bounce back and forth between character systems, within the
> same applications, same files. The company was rewarded with having
> the biggest national market-share in the world among Japanese users.
> Apple came out with an announcement recently that the iPhone 3G will
> offer Japanese input automatically.
>
> That's what started all this. I only wish that RIM would have
> answered my inquiries about this.
>
> Thanks again for taking the time to respond.


don't listen to bob on anything related to the iphone. he's extreme
jealous of what that device offers, so he is crafty in trying to deceive
you.

the weak sound on early iphones was fixed in the first software update.
so now, sound quality is basically the same as any other phone. and keep
in mind the new iphone will be at the very top in sound quality, but he
conveniently neglected to mention that.

check out the 3G iPhone tour on Apple's website, it will answer most of
your questions.

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  #12 (permalink)  
Old 07-06-2008, 01:56 PM
The Bob
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: iPhone Negatives?

Oxford <apony@pasture.com> amazed us all with the following in
news:apony-B53D47.01104106072008@dialup-4.167.115.65.Dial1.Houston1.Level
3.net:

> The Bob <nospam@bob.com> wrote:
>
>> > nah, that's a pure myth, you can replace the iphone battery
>> > yourself, it's only $15 but remember it's very, very unlikely
>> > you'll ever need to replace it since apple put in an enormous, long
>> > lasting battery, it should last 4 years or so without replacement.

>>
>> And void any warranty by cracking open the case.

>
> what? opening the case wouldn't void apple's warranty.
>
>> BTW- use of a soldering iron does not constitute "user replaceable"
>> for many folks.

>
> but it's still user replaceable, you don't need to take it into Apple
> in 4 years is my point.
>


YOu don't have a point and you totally missed mine. I would expect no less
from you.

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  #13 (permalink)  
Old 07-06-2008, 01:59 PM
The Bob
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: iPhone Negatives?

David Moyer <davmoy@world.com> amazed us all with the following in
news:davmoy-6C9481.01345506072008@dialup-
4.167.115.65.Dial1.Houston1.Level3.net:

> David G. Imber <imber@maniform.com> wrote:
>
>> But what it comes down to is whether I can do mail and web
>> access in Japanese. I won't bore you with the long history of being

in
>> a very particular computing minority, but except back when I was in
>> college, where I used UNIX boxes, I've always been a DOS/Windows

user.
>> I can say without qualification that MS has always given the finger

to
>> those who need to do foreign character computing on a US system. The
>> company actually repeatedly broke Windows' ability to accommodate
>> various third party add-ons that benefited our specialized community.
>> It made us wait a year without any software work-arounds because it
>> was planning to bring out XP with a bad but functional multilingual
>> IME.
>>
>> Apple has always taken the opposite view. From the very first
>> you could bounce back and forth between character systems, within the
>> same applications, same files. The company was rewarded with having
>> the biggest national market-share in the world among Japanese users.
>> Apple came out with an announcement recently that the iPhone 3G will
>> offer Japanese input automatically.
>>
>> That's what started all this. I only wish that RIM would have
>> answered my inquiries about this.
>>
>> Thanks again for taking the time to respond.

>
> don't listen to bob on anything related to the iphone. he's extreme
> jealous of what that device offers, so he is crafty in trying to

deceive
> you.


Why would I be jealous? My current phone has much more true
functionality than the iPhone.

>
> the weak sound on early iphones was fixed in the first software

update.

No it wasn't.

> so now, sound quality is basically the same as any other phone.


No it's not.

> and keep
> in mind the new iphone will be at the very top in sound quality,


No it won't.

> but he
> conveniently neglected to mention that.


No, I didn't- I stuck to the truth. Try it some time.

>
> check out the 3G iPhone tour on Apple's website, it will answer most

of
> your questions.
>


Fanbois are so predictable.


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  #14 (permalink)  
Old 07-06-2008, 06:43 PM
David G. Imber
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Default Re: iPhone Negatives?

On Sun, 06 Jul 2008 01:34:55 -0600, David Moyer <davmoy@world.com>
wrote:


>check out the 3G iPhone tour on Apple's website, it will answer most of
>your questions.


I did check it. It's a marvelous promotional piece and I would
expect nothing less than an excellent promotion from the company.

But I would never take the company's own promotion as the
final word on anything.

As for "The Bob", yes, he's perhaps more emotional on the
subject than others, but I do not take any single point of view as
conclusive unless it is my own. I'm still gathering information. I
imagine there will be tons of reviews upon the release of the device,
and I'm sure I'll learn a lot more then.

DGI



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