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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 12-31-2008, 04:59 PM
SpitfireAce
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Default 4 Pin CPU fan with 3 pin motherboard


Hi,
I just bought an Core 2 Duo E8400 and the CPU fan that comes with it
has 4 pins while my motherboard only has one or two 3 pin slots. The
motherboard has the right socket, 775. I have googled and found out that
some have managed to fix it by letting the blue wire from the fan be
disconnected while the other three are connected. This did not fix my
problem, the fan simply won't start. I haven't found any adapters
either. So... any ideas?



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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 01-01-2009, 06:49 AM
A New Day
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Default Re: 4 Pin CPU fan with 3 pin motherboard


"SpitfireAce" <SpitfireAce.3lbg11@no.email.invalid> wrote in message
news:SpitfireAce.3lbg11@no.email.invalid...
>
> Hi,
> I just bought an Core 2 Duo E8400 and the CPU fan that comes with it
> has 4 pins while my motherboard only has one or two 3 pin slots. The
> motherboard has the right socket, 775. I have googled and found out that
> some have managed to fix it by letting the blue wire from the fan be
> disconnected while the other three are connected. This did not fix my
> problem, the fan simply won't start. I haven't found any adapters
> either. So... any ideas?
>
>
>


the 4th wire is for fan speed control.

you can plug the 4 way socket onto the correct 3 way board mounted plug. I
say correct because you must use the one dedicated to the CPU. What does
your MoBo manual say about the CPU header.

Also the socket and plug have directional protrusions (keyway) so you cant
get them arse about face.



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  #3 (permalink)  
Old 01-01-2009, 07:03 AM
A New Day
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: 4 Pin CPU fan with 3 pin motherboard


"SpitfireAce" <SpitfireAce.3lbg11@no.email.invalid> wrote in message
news:SpitfireAce.3lbg11@no.email.invalid...
>
> Hi,
> I just bought an Core 2 Duo E8400 and the CPU fan that comes with it
> has 4 pins while my motherboard only has one or two 3 pin slots. The
> motherboard has the right socket, 775. I have googled and found out that
> some have managed to fix it by letting the blue wire from the fan be
> disconnected while the other three are connected. This did not fix my
> problem, the fan simply won't start. I haven't found any adapters
> either. So... any ideas?
>
>
>


googling found this,

Plug the small 4-pin connector to the "CPU-Fan" 3-pin on your motherboard.
The connector has a tab that will leave the blue wire from your fan
unconnected. This blue wire is the fan speed sensor. Reboot your pc and
press the DELETE key to go into the Bios Setup. Disable the "Smart CPU Fan"
and save/reboot. Your CPU fan should now run full speed, because when you
disable "smart cpu fan in the bios, your motherboard will provide full power
to the "CPU Fan" connector.



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  #4 (permalink)  
Old 01-01-2009, 07:40 AM
do_not_spam_me@my-deja.com
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Default Re: 4 Pin CPU fan with 3 pin motherboard



A New Day wrote:

> the 4th wire is for fan speed control.


Why isn't the voltage wire used for fan speed control, especially when
so many brushless DC fans are rated to run at half voltage?

Bring back EISCA fans!


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  #5 (permalink)  
Old 01-01-2009, 11:46 AM
Paul
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Default Re: 4 Pin CPU fan with 3 pin motherboard

A New Day wrote:
> "SpitfireAce" <SpitfireAce.3lbg11@no.email.invalid> wrote in message
> news:SpitfireAce.3lbg11@no.email.invalid...
>> Hi,
>> I just bought an Core 2 Duo E8400 and the CPU fan that comes with it
>> has 4 pins while my motherboard only has one or two 3 pin slots. The
>> motherboard has the right socket, 775. I have googled and found out that
>> some have managed to fix it by letting the blue wire from the fan be
>> disconnected while the other three are connected. This did not fix my
>> problem, the fan simply won't start. I haven't found any adapters
>> either. So... any ideas?
>>
>>
>>

>
> googling found this,
>
> Plug the small 4-pin connector to the "CPU-Fan" 3-pin on your motherboard.
> The connector has a tab that will leave the blue wire from your fan
> unconnected. This blue wire is the fan speed sensor. Reboot your pc and
> press the DELETE key to go into the Bios Setup. Disable the "Smart CPU Fan"
> and save/reboot. Your CPU fan should now run full speed, because when you
> disable "smart cpu fan in the bios, your motherboard will provide full power
> to the "CPU Fan" connector.
>


The 3 pin connector scheme consists of +12V, GND, and RPM. RPM is an output
from the fan, to the motherboard, which pulses twice per revolution of the fan.
Thus, RPM is the "sensor".

When the 4 pin fan was invented, it added the PWM logic signal. PWM travels
from the motherboard to the fan. It tells the fan how fast to run. If the
PWM wire on the fan is left dangling and not electrically connected to the
fan, the fan is supposed to run at its full speed.

The old way to control the fan speed, was to modulate the +12V signal
to the fan. By sending something between 7V and 12V, you got a measure
of fan speed control.

The new way, relies on full fan voltage (the full 12V), and the PWM signal
allows the fan to use pulse width modulation inside. Using PWM inside
the fan, the fan can create a lower voltage based on the 12V incoming feed,
with good efficiency. So that is a replacement method.

It is possible, in this case, that the motherboard with 3 pin header, is
already reducing the 12V to the fan header, when the fan is a PWM type,
and the fan doesn't like it. The fan may expect the full 12V, and be
using the PWM method - without the full 12V there may be problems
with the MOSFET or whatever is used to commutate the 12V feed.

If the BIOS is decently clever, perhaps disconnecting the PC power
cord, clearing the CMOS, and then attempting to POST into the BIOS,
will result in a fan that spins. The default after clearing the CMOS,
should be for a fan to run at full speed. It is always possible
for the default to be otherwise for the fan control. The user
manual may contain that information.

I find it a bit strange, that a motherboard with a three pin CPU
fan header, accepts an E8400. Is the E8400 listed in the
motherboard compatibility chart ? There could be more to
this story than meets the eye.

Paul


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  #6 (permalink)  
Old 01-01-2009, 12:49 PM
A New Day
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Default Re: 4 Pin CPU fan with 3 pin motherboard


snipped to

>There could be more to this story than meets the eye.


you are most probably right



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  #7 (permalink)  
Old 01-01-2009, 01:23 PM
SpitfireAce
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Default Re: 4 Pin CPU fan with 3 pin motherboard


A New Day;897067 Wrote:
> "SpitfireAce" <SpitfireAce.3lbg11@no.email.invalid> wrote in message
> news:SpitfireAce.3lbg11@no.email.invalid...
> >
> > Hi,
> > I just bought an Core 2 Duo E8400 and the CPU fan that comes with it
> > has 4 pins while my motherboard only has one or two 3 pin slots. The
> > motherboard has the right socket, 775. I have googled and found out

> that
> > some have managed to fix it by letting the blue wire from the fan be
> > disconnected while the other three are connected. This did not fix

> my
> > problem, the fan simply won't start. I haven't found any adapters
> > either. So... any ideas?
> >
> >
> >

>
> googling found this,
>
> Plug the small 4-pin connector to the "CPU-Fan" 3-pin on your
> motherboard.
> The connector has a tab that will leave the blue wire from your fan
> unconnected. This blue wire is the fan speed sensor. Reboot your pc and
>
> press the DELETE key to go into the Bios Setup. Disable the "Smart CPU
> Fan"
> and save/reboot. Your CPU fan should now run full speed, because when
> you
> disable "smart cpu fan in the bios, your motherboard will provide full
> power
> to the "CPU Fan" connector.

I can't find any "Smart CPU Fan" setting in the BIOS.



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  #8 (permalink)  
Old 01-01-2009, 01:27 PM
SpitfireAce
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Default Re: 4 Pin CPU fan with 3 pin motherboard


How do you clear the CMOS and what is CMOS?
I can't find a compatibility chart for my motherboard anywhere and my
manual does not say much, if it helps it's a dell motherboard, model
0YC523.



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  #9 (permalink)  
Old 01-01-2009, 02:24 PM
Ian D
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Default Re: 4 Pin CPU fan with 3 pin motherboard


"A New Day" <CastrolR40@btinternet.com> wrote in message
news:caOdnfWiydB9VMHUnZ2dnUVZ8i-dnZ2d@bt.com...
>
> snipped to
>
>>There could be more to this story than meets the eye.

>
> you are most probably right
>
>


What's really strange is that the OP says there are only one or
two 3 pin connectors. Doesn't give too many cooling options.
It may be a custom MB designed for a specialized application.



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  #10 (permalink)  
Old 01-01-2009, 02:29 PM
A New Day
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: 4 Pin CPU fan with 3 pin motherboard


"Ian D" <taurus@nowhere.com> wrote in message
news:K9KdnQB6MKy0fcHUnZ2dnUVZ_gSdnZ2d@giganews.com ...
>
> "A New Day" <CastrolR40@btinternet.com> wrote in message
> news:caOdnfWiydB9VMHUnZ2dnUVZ8i-dnZ2d@bt.com...
>>
>> snipped to
>>
>>>There could be more to this story than meets the eye.

>>
>> you are most probably right
>>
>>

>
> What's really strange is that the OP says there are only one or
> two 3 pin connectors. Doesn't give too many cooling options.
> It may be a custom MB designed for a specialized application.
>
>
>


and is it one or two........its not that difficult to be precise.

maybe the case fans are being jumpered to power plug adaptors.




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  #11 (permalink)  
Old 01-02-2009, 04:21 PM
A New Day
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Default Re: 4 Pin CPU fan with 3 pin motherboard


"SpitfireAce" <SpitfireAce.3ldzyv@no.email.invalid> wrote in message
news:SpitfireAce.3ldzyv@no.email.invalid...
>
> How do you clear the CMOS and what is CMOS?
> I can't find a compatibility chart for my motherboard anywhere and my
> manual does not say much, if it helps it's a dell motherboard, model
> 0YC523.
>
>
>


ahhhh a Dell MoBo.........hmmmmmm, yes.

rather than explain,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CMOS

without a manual finding the right jumper is not that easy so read the first
part of Spinox post

http://www.computing.net/answers/har...mos/21099.html





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  #12 (permalink)  
Old 01-02-2009, 04:23 PM
SpitfireAce
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Default Re: 4 Pin CPU fan with 3 pin motherboard


A New Day;897750 Wrote:
> "Ian D" <taurus@nowhere.com> wrote in message
> news:K9KdnQB6MKy0fcHUnZ2dnUVZ_gSdnZ2d@giganews.com ...
> >
> > "A New Day" <CastrolR40@btinternet.com> wrote in message
> > news:caOdnfWiydB9VMHUnZ2dnUVZ8i-dnZ2d@bt.com...
> >>
> >> snipped to
> >>
> >>>There could be more to this story than meets the eye.
> >>
> >> you are most probably right
> >>
> >>

> >
> > What's really strange is that the OP says there are only one or
> > two 3 pin connectors. Doesn't give too many cooling options.
> > It may be a custom MB designed for a specialized application.
> >
> >
> >

>
> and is it one or two........its not that difficult to be precise.
>
> maybe the case fans are being jumpered to power plug adaptors.


There are two 3 pin connectors on the motherboard.



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  #13 (permalink)  
Old 01-02-2009, 08:13 PM
kony
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: 4 Pin CPU fan with 3 pin motherboard

On Thu, 1 Jan 2009 08:27:32 -0600, SpitfireAce
<SpitfireAce.3ldzyv@no.email.invalid> wrote:

>
>How do you clear the CMOS and what is CMOS?
>I can't find a compatibility chart for my motherboard anywhere and my
>manual does not say much, if it helps it's a dell motherboard, model
>0YC523.
>



Unplug AC power to PSU, pull out the coin cell battery for
10 minutes.

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  #14 (permalink)  
Old 01-02-2009, 08:14 PM
Paul
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Default Re: 4 Pin CPU fan with 3 pin motherboard

SpitfireAce wrote:
> How do you clear the CMOS and what is CMOS?
> I can't find a compatibility chart for my motherboard anywhere and my
> manual does not say much, if it helps it's a dell motherboard, model
> 0YC523.
>


When you're in the BIOS, the BIOS settings have to be stored
somewhere. The Southbridge chip on the motherboard, has a
tiny area of 256 bytes of memory. It stores values from
when you save the BIOS settings.

(A second way for the BIOS to store info, is to actually
update an area of the BIOS flash chip. That is used for
DMI/ESCD data, which we're not worried about right now.)

The 0YC523 seems to be associated with the XPS 400. This is the
tech manual for the XPS 400, showing a picture of the motherboard.
There is a jumper called RTCRST (Real Time Clock ReSeT), which
when used, also clears the 256 byte CMOS memory. Both the real
time clock and the CMOS memory, live in the Southbridge and
are controlled by the same jumper. When you use the RTCRST jumper
to clear the CMOS, the clock should be reset to an older time as
well. That is how you can tell whether the CMOS jumper thing
worked. When you get back into the BIOS (and you should go there
immediately on the first power up after clearing the CMOS), you'll
be able to set the correct time again for the onboard clock.

http://support.dell.com/support/edoc.../sm/techov.htm

The CMOS clearing procedure is described here.

http://support.dell.com/support/edoc....htm#wp1053729

As a safety precaution, you should always unplug the computer before
doing the CMOS clearing procedure. Motherboards older than the
one in the XPS 400, had a habit of getting a dual diode burned on
them, when that jumper gets used by the customer. Even though that
chipset and motherboard design, probably doesn't have that defect,
you should still unplug for safety. It is just a good habit to
get into. There are a number of motherboard manuals, which
in fact have incorrect info on all the steps of the procedure,
so mistakes happen all the time.

What clearing the CMOS is supposed to do, is return the BIOS
to default settings. The BIOS should have some good "default"
values, such as making the fan run, setting the memory to
the proper speed and so on. Overclockers may clear the
CMOS, to remove too high a frequency setting from the BIOS,
in order that the motherboard can POST again. If you have
any custom settings in the BIOS, they will have to be
re-entered in the BIOS screens as well. It isn't likely
that the Dell is going to need much more than setting
the boot order (floppy,cdrom,hard_drive).

Paul

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  #15 (permalink)  
Old 01-02-2009, 09:07 PM
CBFalconer
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Default Re: 4 Pin CPU fan with 3 pin motherboard

SpitfireAce wrote:
>
> How do you clear the CMOS and what is CMOS?


By removing power from it. Which is normally supplied by a
battery, when the main plug is disconnected.

Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor.

--
Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukah, Happy New Year
Joyeux Noel, Bonne Annee, Frohe Weihnachten
Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
<http://cbfalconer.home.att.net>

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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 01-03-2009, 10:47 AM
Paul
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Default Re: 4 Pin CPU fan with 3 pin motherboard

SpitfireAce wrote:

> I can't find any "Smart CPU Fan" setting in the BIOS.
>
>


Will you be telling us the name of the motherboard at
some point ?

Paul

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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 01-03-2009, 02:20 PM
A New Day
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: 4 Pin CPU fan with 3 pin motherboard


"SpitfireAce" <SpitfireAce.3ldzyu@no.email.invalid> wrote in message
news:SpitfireAce.3ldzyu@no.email.invalid...
>
> A New Day;897067 Wrote:
>> "SpitfireAce" <SpitfireAce.3lbg11@no.email.invalid> wrote in message
>> news:SpitfireAce.3lbg11@no.email.invalid...
>> >
>> > Hi,
>> > I just bought an Core 2 Duo E8400 and the CPU fan that comes with it
>> > has 4 pins while my motherboard only has one or two 3 pin slots. The
>> > motherboard has the right socket, 775. I have googled and found out

>> that
>> > some have managed to fix it by letting the blue wire from the fan be
>> > disconnected while the other three are connected. This did not fix

>> my
>> > problem, the fan simply won't start. I haven't found any adapters
>> > either. So... any ideas?
>> >
>> >
>> >

>>
>> googling found this,
>>
>> Plug the small 4-pin connector to the "CPU-Fan" 3-pin on your
>> motherboard.
>> The connector has a tab that will leave the blue wire from your fan
>> unconnected. This blue wire is the fan speed sensor. Reboot your pc and
>>
>> press the DELETE key to go into the Bios Setup. Disable the "Smart CPU
>> Fan"
>> and save/reboot. Your CPU fan should now run full speed, because when
>> you
>> disable "smart cpu fan in the bios, your motherboard will provide full
>> power
>> to the "CPU Fan" connector.

> I can't find any "Smart CPU Fan" setting in the BIOS.
>
>
>


you could run Belarc Advisor software to see if it can find more info on the
MoBo



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  #18 (permalink)  
Old 01-04-2009, 11:31 AM
SpitfireAce
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Default Re: 4 Pin CPU fan with 3 pin motherboard


Judging from the picture of the motherboard you posted Paul
('Documentation' (http://tinyurl.com/7cjo4e)), it seems as if the 3 pin
header on my motherboard is actually for clearing the CMOS, not for the
CPU fan as I thought.
And where it says fan connector (CPU FAN), that is not a 4 nor 3 pin
header...
So I think I simply have to buy a new motherboard...

Which brings me to a new problem. If you take a look at the link Paul
posted once again, in the upper right corner there is a front panel I/O
connector.
The cord looks like a PATA cable but the connector is a bit smaller.
I've tried to disconnect it but then I can't boot the computer.
I've been looking at the Asus P5KPL/1600 motherboard, here's a picture
of it http://tinyurl.com/7sguvw
I think it has two PATA headers but what I'm worried about is: will it
have that front panel I/O connector? Can one of the PATA headers be for
the front panel I/O connector? Or will I have to buy a new computer case
aswell (please say no :P)?



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  #19 (permalink)  
Old 01-04-2009, 02:29 PM
Paul
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Default Re: 4 Pin CPU fan with 3 pin motherboard

SpitfireAce wrote:
> Judging from the picture of the motherboard you posted Paul
> ('Documentation' (http://tinyurl.com/7cjo4e)), it seems as if the 3 pin
> header on my motherboard is actually for clearing the CMOS, not for the
> CPU fan as I thought.
> And where it says fan connector (CPU FAN), that is not a 4 nor 3 pin
> header...
> So I think I simply have to buy a new motherboard...
>
> Which brings me to a new problem. If you take a look at the link Paul
> posted once again, in the upper right corner there is a front panel I/O
> connector.
> The cord looks like a PATA cable but the connector is a bit smaller.
> I've tried to disconnect it but then I can't boot the computer.
> I've been looking at the Asus P5KPL/1600 motherboard, here's a picture
> of it http://tinyurl.com/7sguvw
> I think it has two PATA headers but what I'm worried about is: will it
> have that front panel I/O connector? Can one of the PATA headers be for
> the front panel I/O connector? Or will I have to buy a new computer case
> aswell (please say no :P)?
>
>


So the first problem is, is there documentation that says the
OEY523 board with 945P Northbridge, DDR2 RAM and so on, supports
an E8400 ? I get the impression the computer may have shipped
with a Pentium D installed in it, which is a previous
generation of processor.

With the Dell design, it looks like the motherboard is BTX,
and the CPU blower doubles as ventilation for the computer
case. If you were changing out the processor on this beast,
you'd keep the old cooling solution. The thing is, both
the old processor and the new processor, should have roughly
the same dimensions. The new processor is 65W, and likely
runs cooler than the old processor. You'd keep the Dell cooler,
the custom Dell fan cable and connector would work with
what Dell provides.

I understand on some Dells, the connector on the blower is a
five pin. It likely shares features with the cooling on
other computers, but you need a pinout for the connector,
in order to rig up alternate solutions. The thing is,
if the computer is going to shut off, because it
doesn't get an RPM signal from that fan connector,
you'd at least need a way to disable RPM detection
or the like.

It is possible to find adapter cables, which draw power
from a Molex drive connector, to power a fan. That gets
the fan spinning. But you also need to connect the RPM signal,
so the BIOS can see it. That would take the fewest experiments
to get running. If the Dell connector is proprietary, then
you'll need to find someone who has figured out the Dell
pinout.

It is so much easier to just continue to use the Dell
cooler. If the cooler is working OK, then just plug the
new processor in. If you've already had the new processor
installed, then there'd be no additional harm by testing
with the Dell cooler in place. If the processor
hasn't been plugged in yet, then stop right there.

I presume the VID tables (VID is the voltage sensing
on some contacts on the processor), would work in a
way to not damage the E8400 if it was plugged in.
The Vcore regulator might even support D-VID (dynamic
VID changes, for EIST power management). But I'd
feel more comfortable if someone else had tried this
already, rather than being a guinea pig.

The Dell BIOS won't necessarily have BIOS code to
identify a Core2 Duo 45nm processor. There might not
be a microcode patch in there (which is not the end of
the world). It all depends on whether the BIOS throws
a hissy fit, and won't start, because of what the
enumeration shows.

Another thing - the 945P chipset is officially 1066/800/533 FSB.
The E8400 is FSB1333. Hmmm. Hope someone else
has done this already...

http://www.intel.com/products/deskto...p-overview.htm

Sure, a new motherboard might seem like a solution, but
let's consider the requirements. BTX form factor.
Weird shape. Need for Dell custom cooler to fit in
exactly the right position. And so on. I'd start
with a new computer case, new motherboard, and
transport what can be scavenged from the old
system, if you're really attached to that E8400.
Keyboard, mouse, disk drive, optical drive, monitor,
maybe RAM.

Will the old Dell OS boot on the new board ?
Maybe. Will the Dell restore partition or
Dell restore CD work on the new motherboard ?
No, as it is going to check for its motherboard.
You might need another copy of WinXP if there is
ever a need to restore it (i.e. reinstall after
a virus or malware attack).

For least hassle, you really need to understand what
processors have been tried or tested in that computer.
Once you go outside the boundaries, a lot more stuff
has to be changed.

Paul

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  #20 (permalink)  
Old 01-04-2009, 07:36 PM
PS
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: 4 Pin CPU fan with 3 pin motherboard

SpitfireAce wrote:
> Judging from the picture of the motherboard you posted Paul
> ('Documentation' (http://tinyurl.com/7cjo4e)), it seems as if the 3 pin
> header on my motherboard is actually for clearing the CMOS, not for the
> CPU fan as I thought.
> And where it says fan connector (CPU FAN), that is not a 4 nor 3 pin
> header...
> So I think I simply have to buy a new motherboard...
>
> Which brings me to a new problem. If you take a look at the link Paul
> posted once again, in the upper right corner there is a front panel I/O
> connector.
> The cord looks like a PATA cable but the connector is a bit smaller.
> I've tried to disconnect it but then I can't boot the computer.
> I've been looking at the Asus P5KPL/1600 motherboard, here's a picture
> of it http://tinyurl.com/7sguvw
> I think it has two PATA headers but what I'm worried about is: will it
> have that front panel I/O connector? Can one of the PATA headers be for
> the front panel I/O connector? Or will I have to buy a new computer case
> aswell (please say no :P)?
>
>

I'm coming late to this discussion, but is there some reason you didn't
post the Dell model number of the computer?
The Dell support site is organized around models not motherboards. It
also has detailed layout diagrams of the motherboards.
Be that as it may, if you have a 9150/xps400 the original processor was
a P4 Pentium DE and it's unlikely the new one is compatible.
Further the Dell front panel connector is proprietary and unique to
Dell. It is not for the faint of heart or technically inexperienced
to try to marry a Dell case with an Asus mobo. You will have to attempt
to scope out the Dell wiring, which I've not seen documented.
Anyway why didn't you post this in the Dell hardware group?
*alt.sys.pc-clone.dell*

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  #21 (permalink)  
Old 01-05-2009, 05:59 PM
SpitfireAce
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: 4 Pin CPU fan with 3 pin motherboard


Thanks for all the help guys!
It seems that my processor cooler is passive, it doesn't have a fan on
it it's just one big black thing although right next to it is a fan. I'm
afraid that if I put my processor in, it will fry due to the passive
cooler.

So if I buy a new motherboard, I would need a new case, and in addition
to that, a new OS?
Are you certain that I will not be able to reinstall the OS if any
problems should occur? I've tried reinstalling a couple of times before
and I don't need a disc. I simply click a button whilst the computer is
booting up when you see the DELL logotype and it brings up a menu that
will allow your computer to reinstall the computer. I don't think dell
uses the same method as other companies as the installation is very
quick. So what I'm wondering is if the system restore (I think Dell
calls it) needs the motherboard or the harddrive or perhaps both?



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  #22 (permalink)  
Old 01-06-2009, 12:53 PM
Paul
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: 4 Pin CPU fan with 3 pin motherboard

SpitfireAce wrote:
> Thanks for all the help guys!
> It seems that my processor cooler is passive, it doesn't have a fan on
> it it's just one big black thing although right next to it is a fan. I'm
> afraid that if I put my processor in, it will fry due to the passive
> cooler.
>
> So if I buy a new motherboard, I would need a new case, and in addition
> to that, a new OS?
> Are you certain that I will not be able to reinstall the OS if any
> problems should occur? I've tried reinstalling a couple of times before
> and I don't need a disc. I simply click a button whilst the computer is
> booting up when you see the DELL logotype and it brings up a menu that
> will allow your computer to reinstall the computer. I don't think dell
> uses the same method as other companies as the installation is very
> quick. So what I'm wondering is if the system restore (I think Dell
> calls it) needs the motherboard or the harddrive or perhaps both?
>


I don't know the details of the Dell scheme. I'm just warning
you that it is a possible outcome - you may install the new
motherboard, and some day, when you want to use the reinstallation
feature, it might not work.

The processor cooler is active, if the same fan that is used to
cool the computer case, is also causing air to be pulled
through the CPU cooler. It is a way for one fan to do the
job of two fans. Sometimes, those fans have a rather large
CFM rating, and if the computer gets warm enough, a fan
like that can really move a lot of air.

There have been computer designs, where if you wanted to use
a higher power processor, a different (passive) heatsink
assembly was required. When Dell was the source of the
upgrade processor, it was accompanied by a passive heatsink
with an extra heatpipe on it. It is possible, with the
"black thing" you've got currently, that it can handle
a wide range of processor substitutions.

If you buy a new motherboard, chances are it won't be
the same formfactor as the existing one. Even if you
searched for a BTX motherboard, I'm not sure
there is any guarantee the position of the LGA775
socket, would line up with the Dell custom cooler.
You also have the tiny issue, of PANEL header compatibility,
which would require a little bit of work to fix. If Dell
doesn't document the pins on the PANEL header, you might not
know where the wiring should go, when it is connected to
a new motherboard.

So a new computer case might make the project easier,
stick in the new motherboard, new processor, use the
cooler that came with the processor, recycle the PSU,
hard drive, optical drive, keyboard, mouse, from the
old system. Maybe the RAM can be reused, if both systems
are DDR2 based. Try booting with your current OS, and hope
there isn't a driver needed (go into the BIOS and
select IDE rather than AHCI or RAID).

It is coming pretty close to building a computer from
scratch.

Paul

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  #23 (permalink)  
Old 01-07-2009, 06:02 PM
SpitfireAce
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: 4 Pin CPU fan with 3 pin motherboard


Paul;903094 Wrote:
>
>
> It is coming pretty close to building a computer from
> scratch.
>
> Paul


Indeed it is...
I think I simply have to buy a new computer case as I don't want to
risk frying my new processor.
I already upgraded my RAM so I know they will work on a new
motherboard.
When you said I should recycle my PSU, HDD, Optical drive etc... did
you mean recycle as in throw it away in a good way for the environment
or did you mean reuse it with my practically new computer? My English is
not excellent, sorry.



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  #24 (permalink)  
Old 01-08-2009, 04:56 PM
Paul
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: 4 Pin CPU fan with 3 pin motherboard

SpitfireAce wrote:
> Paul;903094 Wrote:
>>
>> It is coming pretty close to building a computer from
>> scratch.
>>
>> Paul

>
> Indeed it is...
> I think I simply have to buy a new computer case as I don't want to
> risk frying my new processor.
> I already upgraded my RAM so I know they will work on a new
> motherboard.
> When you said I should recycle my PSU, HDD, Optical drive etc... did
> you mean recycle as in throw it away in a good way for the environment
> or did you mean reuse it with my practically new computer? My English is
> not excellent, sorry.
>
>


Standard components in a computer can be reused.

Any components which are compatible, can be moved from
the old computer to the new one.

Paul

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