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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 02-07-2011, 12:45 AM
Kurt Ullman
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Default Hardwire or wifi

The place I will be renting for a couple of months has both WiFi and
ethernet cabling, although were it comes out isn't all that convenient.
I have an Apple Airport Express that I carry with me. Am I likely to get
faster service using the regular WiFi, the AE for WiFi, or is it likely
to make little difference?

--
"Even I realized that money was to politicians what the ecalyptus tree is to koala bears: food, water, shelter and something to crap on."
---PJ O'Rourke

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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 02-07-2011, 02:30 AM
Char Jackson
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Default Re: Hardwire or wifi

On Sun, 06 Feb 2011 20:45:00 -0500, Kurt Ullman <kurtullman@yahoo.com>
wrote:

>The place I will be renting for a couple of months has both WiFi and
>ethernet cabling, although were it comes out isn't all that convenient.
>I have an Apple Airport Express that I carry with me. Am I likely to get
>faster service using the regular WiFi, the AE for WiFi, or is it likely
>to make little difference?


Without knowing what's on the other end of the Ethernet cable, or on
the other end of the wireless connection for that matter, it's hard to
say which will be 'better'. The usual answer is that cabled is more
reliable and potentially faster than wireless, but it seems likely
that both will be limited by the unspecified speed of the Internet
connection. Since you'll be there for a couple of months, you have
plenty of time to experiment.


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  #3 (permalink)  
Old 02-07-2011, 11:59 AM
Prinzip Gavrilo
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Default Re: Hardwire or wifi

In article <G-2dndGKiKw_09LQnZ2dnUVZ_v-dnZ2d@earthlink.com>,
Kurt Ullman <kurtullman@yahoo.com> wrote:

> The place I will be renting for a couple of months has both WiFi and
> ethernet cabling, although were it comes out isn't all that convenient.
> I have an Apple Airport Express that I carry with me. Am I likely to get
> faster service using the regular WiFi, the AE for WiFi, or is it likely
> to make little difference?


Ethernet is always faster and certainly more "secure." For your basic
Internet (email, Googling) wireless is fine. If you want to do any
serious video streaming, use the Ethernet. If you want to transfer files
between computers locally, fergawdsake use the Ethernet.

--
Next year in Sarajevo ...

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  #4 (permalink)  
Old 02-07-2011, 12:08 PM
Kurt Ullman
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Default Re: Hardwire or wifi

In article <jkpuk6ltv91uji4a2drtpbst1bjmuhbuhv@4ax.com>,
Char Jackson <none@none.invalid> wrote:

> On Sun, 06 Feb 2011 20:45:00 -0500, Kurt Ullman <kurtullman@yahoo.com>
> wrote:
>
> >The place I will be renting for a couple of months has both WiFi and
> >ethernet cabling, although were it comes out isn't all that convenient.
> >I have an Apple Airport Express that I carry with me. Am I likely to get
> >faster service using the regular WiFi, the AE for WiFi, or is it likely
> >to make little difference?

>
> Without knowing what's on the other end of the Ethernet cable, or on
> the other end of the wireless connection for that matter, it's hard to
> say which will be 'better'.

The WiFi's are connected to the same head end (for lack of a better
term) as the ethernet. I was wondering if having my own WiFi would mean
less competition and thus be faster than using the communal WiFi.

--
"Even I realized that money was to politicians what the ecalyptus tree is to koala bears: food, water, shelter and something to crap on."
---PJ O'Rourke

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  #5 (permalink)  
Old 02-07-2011, 06:17 PM
Char Jackson
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: Hardwire or wifi

On Mon, 07 Feb 2011 08:08:04 -0500, Kurt Ullman <kurtullman@yahoo.com>
wrote:

>In article <jkpuk6ltv91uji4a2drtpbst1bjmuhbuhv@4ax.com>,
> Char Jackson <none@none.invalid> wrote:
>
>> On Sun, 06 Feb 2011 20:45:00 -0500, Kurt Ullman <kurtullman@yahoo.com>
>> wrote:
>>
>> >The place I will be renting for a couple of months has both WiFi and
>> >ethernet cabling, although were it comes out isn't all that convenient.
>> >I have an Apple Airport Express that I carry with me. Am I likely to get
>> >faster service using the regular WiFi, the AE for WiFi, or is it likely
>> >to make little difference?

>>
>> Without knowing what's on the other end of the Ethernet cable, or on
>> the other end of the wireless connection for that matter, it's hard to
>> say which will be 'better'.

> The WiFi's are connected to the same head end (for lack of a better
>term) as the ethernet. I was wondering if having my own WiFi would mean
>less competition and thus be faster than using the communal WiFi.


There are still too many unknowns to answer that for sure, but it's
possible, yes.


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  #6 (permalink)  
Old 02-07-2011, 10:17 PM
ps56k
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: Hardwire or wifi


"Char Jackson" <none@none.invalid> wrote in message
news:l6h0l6t8g88en9dbtgss7490o8s45mokqc@4ax.com...
> On Mon, 07 Feb 2011 08:08:04 -0500, Kurt Ullman <kurtullman@yahoo.com>
> wrote:
>
>>In article <jkpuk6ltv91uji4a2drtpbst1bjmuhbuhv@4ax.com>,
>> Char Jackson <none@none.invalid> wrote:
>>
>>> On Sun, 06 Feb 2011 20:45:00 -0500, Kurt Ullman <kurtullman@yahoo.com>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>> >The place I will be renting for a couple of months has both WiFi and
>>> >ethernet cabling, although were it comes out isn't all that convenient.
>>> >I have an Apple Airport Express that I carry with me. Am I likely to
>>> >get
>>> >faster service using the regular WiFi, the AE for WiFi, or is it likely
>>> >to make little difference?
>>>
>>> Without knowing what's on the other end of the Ethernet cable, or on
>>> the other end of the wireless connection for that matter, it's hard to
>>> say which will be 'better'.

>> The WiFi's are connected to the same head end (for lack of a better
>>term) as the ethernet. I was wondering if having my own WiFi would mean
>>less competition and thus be faster than using the communal WiFi.

>
> There are still too many unknowns to answer that for sure, but it's
> possible, yes.
>


"less compitition" - you are probably all using the exact same WiFi freqs -
2.4GHZ
so even if you are on different non-overlapping channels - hard to say -
and if some are N wideband, or G, or B - it gets interesting -




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  #7 (permalink)  
Old 02-07-2011, 11:22 PM
Jeff Liebermann
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: Hardwire or wifi

On Sun, 06 Feb 2011 20:45:00 -0500, Kurt Ullman <kurtullman@yahoo.com>
wrote:

>The place I will be renting for a couple of months has both WiFi and
>ethernet cabling, although were it comes out isn't all that convenient.


Run some CAT5 down the hallway or whatever it takes to extend the
ethernet to where it's needed. Wi-Fi should only be used when other
options are not available. Since you'll only be there for 2 months,
temporary wire runs are probably tolerable.

>I have an Apple Airport Express that I carry with me. Am I likely to get
>faster service using the regular WiFi, the AE for WiFi, or is it likely
>to make little difference?


If the building is setup for Wi-Fi to all the rentals, it's likely
that you'll see considerable competition and interference from other
Wi-Fi users. A site survey with a spectrum analyzer or sniffer should
offer some clues. Trying both and running ping for a few minutes
should give you a clue from the variations in latency. If you're
planning to run VoIP, I would definately go with wired ethernet to
avoid jitter caused by lost packets.

However, if you must do wireless, the Airport Express is a good enough
access point and/or travel router. The lack of an external antenna
makes the range somewhat marginal. If you must compare the house
wireless with the do it thyself variety, just cound the number of
walls that each signal has to penetrate.

The Airport Express will also do either 2.4 or 5.7Ghz. If your
computah can do 5.7GHz 802.11a, then this would be a good way to avoid
interference from the other Wi-Fi users. However, if the
establishment offers both 2.4 and 5.7Ghz wireless, forget that idea.

If the wired and wireless networks DHCP server return different IP
address blocks, the router might be configured to give priority to
ethernet packets over wireless via QoS. I've seen this is hotels
where the office PC's are on the wired network and the owner wants
them to have premium performance. Just a heads up.



--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

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  #8 (permalink)  
Old 02-08-2011, 02:25 AM
Rich Johnson
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: Hardwire or wifi

On 2/7/2011 11:17 AM, Char Jackson wrote:
> On Mon, 07 Feb 2011 08:08:04 -0500, Kurt Ullman<kurtullman@yahoo.com>
> wrote:
>
>> In article<jkpuk6ltv91uji4a2drtpbst1bjmuhbuhv@4ax.com >,
>> Char Jackson<none@none.invalid> wrote:
>>
>>> On Sun, 06 Feb 2011 20:45:00 -0500, Kurt Ullman<kurtullman@yahoo.com>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> The place I will be renting for a couple of months has both WiFi and
>>>> ethernet cabling, although were it comes out isn't all that convenient.
>>>> I have an Apple Airport Express that I carry with me. Am I likely to get
>>>> faster service using the regular WiFi, the AE for WiFi, or is it likely
>>>> to make little difference?
>>>
>>> Without knowing what's on the other end of the Ethernet cable, or on
>>> the other end of the wireless connection for that matter, it's hard to
>>> say which will be 'better'.

>> The WiFi's are connected to the same head end (for lack of a better
>> term) as the ethernet. I was wondering if having my own WiFi would mean
>> less competition and thus be faster than using the communal WiFi.

>
> There are still too many unknowns to answer that for sure, but it's
> possible, yes.
>

First, security...

Wired could be more secure, if you know the network and where it goes
and are in control of who connects into it. If it is a shared jack with
someone else in control of the Ethernet, no, it is not secure. If you
connect to the network be sure to have a firewall (and a good one)
enabled on your PCs or buy a hardware unit.

Wireless if secured with WPA2 and a large mixed random character pass
phrase, can be secure, but again if you are not in control of the
network, forget about real security.

Speed. Test both at the url below.

http://www.speedtest.net

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  #9 (permalink)  
Old 02-08-2011, 04:20 AM
Jeff Liebermann
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Posts: n/a
Default Re: Hardwire or wifi

On Mon, 07 Feb 2011 19:25:50 -0800, Rich Johnson
<richj@remove.this.tairedd.com> wrote:

>First, security...


Nobody cares about security until AFTER they have been hacked and have
lost money, time, effort, privacy, etc. I guess I'm no exception.
Last week, one my customers had an insider security breach. So, I'm
now working on encrypting all the key files (using TrueCrypt).

>Wired could be more secure, if you know the network and where it goes
>and are in control of who connects into it.


That's a big if. I've done better hacking wired connections than
wireless. Little if no wired traffic is encrypted. If I can connect
to the backhaul port, or setup a port for monitoring, I get
everything. A few filters, a capture file, and I walk away with the
grand prize.

Wireless is not so easy. Encryption is finally becoming popular.
Sniffing is amazingly difficult because you usually have to be able to
hear both sides of the exchange. If all you want to do is grab
logins, passwords, and session cookies, then one side is sufficient.
But if you want to capture everything in its original context, both
sides are necessary.

>If it is a shared jack with
>someone else in control of the Ethernet, no, it is not secure. If you
>connect to the network be sure to have a firewall (and a good one)
>enabled on your PCs or buy a hardware unit.


The someone else that's in control of the ethernet can capture all
your traffic. In a hotel/rental situation, you have to trust the
wireless network owner. Otherwise, you have to run all your traffic
through a VPN service provider to make sure the wireless network owner
doesn't capture your traffic.
<http://wireless.navas.us/wiki/Wi-Fi#VPN_Service_Providers>

>Wireless if secured with WPA2 and a large mixed random character pass
>phrase, can be secure, but again if you are not in control of the
>network, forget about real security.


"Can be secure" is correct.
<http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/wireless/wireless-howto/30278-how-to-crack-wpa--wpa2>
Short and dumb pass phrases can be cracked by brute force.

>Speed. Test both at the url below.
>http://www.speedtest.net


Maybe. Most ISP's provide their own speed test servers. I would use
the one that's closest to your internet connection.

Speed testing for fairly slow connections are easy enough. Fast
connections, such as DOCSIS 3 cable connections at 15Mbits/sec and
faster fiber connections are not so easy. These almost demand that
you use the nearest speed test server. If you get unusually low
numbers, try a closer server.

Measuring the download speed using the internet also doesn't do
anything for benchmarking the local wireless and wired connections.
For that, you need to setup a local speed test server and use programs
such as IPerf, JPerf, NetStress, etc. Such tests will isolate
performance problems to the wired or wireless network, or the various
component devices, such as computers, router, switch, wiring, etc.
<http://www.performancewifi.net/performance-wifi/products/netstress-network-benchmarking.htm>
<http://openmaniak.com/iperf.php>
<http://code.google.com/p/xjperf/>


--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

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