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Old 10-10-2007, 02:15 PM
Alan Parkington
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Default Flip-flops blur broadband vision

From
http://www.theage.com.au/news/busine...695823575.html

DURING the past week, Communications Minister Helen Coonan played out in
public the stop-start, flip-flop, yes-no approach to policymaking that has
created Australia's broadband drought and the policy mess that is blocking
investment in Australia's broadband future.

These events also allowed all to understand more clearly why Telstra has
started a campaign to inform people about the choices being denied to them
because of government policies and regulations. As usual, Senator Coonan
focused on process, regulation and red tape - not investment in broadband,
e-medicine, distance learning or other initiatives that would improve the
quality of life.

The latest bad idea: to split Telstra in two. Separation is a bad idea
because it would damage shareholder value, cost taxpayers, increase prices
for consumers, and ensure another six to eight-year delay in broadbanding
Australia.

Senator Coonan's decision to put separation on the agenda was a major
flip-flop in the policy of the Howard Government. Consider the following:

?On March 9, 2005, Senator Coonan said in the Senate: "The . Government has
always maintained . that structural separation of Telstra cannot under any
circumstance be supported."

?In October last year, as part of the T3 sale, she signed a prospectus that
included a promise of regulatory forbearance. That is, the Government of
Australia certified that there would be no changes in regulations adverse to
the interests of Telstra shareholders until after 2009.

?Flip last Tuesday to pro-separation, saying to reporters: "We are looking
at whether or not some structural separation may eventuate in any event as a
result of the expert taskforce."

?Flop on Friday, at a meeting of the Australian Computer Society with the
statement that: "There will not be unilateral structural separation of
Telstra."

?Flip again on Sunday, stating: ". we have no current intention to
unilaterally require structural separation of Telstra." So now we are back
to no "current" intention. What about tomorrow? Next month? Next year?

With this dramatic example of wavering and indecisiveness at the highest
level, all can now see why there is so little investment in broadband in
Australia compared with the rest of the developed world. Responsible boards
and executives do not invest billions of dollars in a new technology when a
government that regulates 50 per cent of your revenue is so confused.



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Old 10-10-2007, 06:40 PM
Rod Speed
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Default Re: Flip-flops blur broadband vision

Alan Parkington <parkingtona@team.telstra.com> wrote:
> From
> http://www.theage.com.au/news/busine...695823575.html


> DURING the past week, Communications Minister Helen Coonan played out in public the stop-start, flip-flop, yes-no
> approach to policymaking that has created Australia's broadband drought


There is no broadband drought, you stupid terminal ****wit.

> and the policy mess that is blocking investment in Australia's broadband future.


So stupid that it hasnt even noticed the investment in adsl2+ and Opel.

> These events also allowed all to understand more clearly why Telstra
> has started a campaign to inform people about the choices being
> denied to them because of government policies and regulations.


Yep, the govt aint actually stupid enough to allow telstra to
return to the monopoly it once had. Neither is the opposition.

> As usual, Senator Coonan focused on process, regulation and red tape - not investment in broadband, e-medicine,
> distance learning or other initiatives that would improve the quality of life.


All of that is happening right now, ****wit.

> The latest bad idea: to split Telstra in two.


Tell that to the ****wits in the labor party. Thats labor policy, ****wit.

> Separation is a bad idea because it would damage shareholder value, cost taxpayers, increase prices for consumers,


Very likely.

> and ensure another six to eight-year delay in broadbanding Australia.


Bare faced lie, and there is no 'another' either.

> Senator Coonan's decision to put separation on the agenda


She didnt even do that, just goosed telstra with it and rubbed telsta's
nose in the FACT that if telstra continues with its strike on FTTN, the
inevitable result of that will be that someone else gets to do that
instead, and that that will have the inevitable result of ripping
away telstra's complete control over the entire CAN.

> was a major flip-flop in the policy of the Howard Government.


Thanks for that completely superfluous proof that you have
never ever had a ****ing clue about anything at all, ever.

> Consider the following:


> ?On March 9, 2005, Senator Coonan said in the Senate: "The .
> Government has always maintained . that structural separation of Telstra cannot under any circumstance be supported."


That was before the FTTN strike, ****wit.

> ?In October last year, as part of the T3 sale, she signed a
> prospectus that included a promise of regulatory forbearance. That is, the Government of Australia certified that
> there would be no changes in regulations adverse to the interests of Telstra
> shareholders until after 2009.


She didnt say anything about any loss of complete
control over the CAN by regulations, ****wit.

> ?Flip last Tuesday to pro-separation, saying to reporters: "We are looking at whether or not some structural
> separation may eventuate in any event as a result of the expert taskforce."


And it would be stupid not to given that that is inevitable if the taskforce
doesnt get telstra to do the lot, and thats not going to happen.

> ?Flop on Friday, at a meeting of the Australian Computer Society with the statement that: "There will not be
> unilateral structural separation of Telstra."


Thats just saying the same thing she's said all along, ****wit.

> ?Flip again on Sunday, stating: ". we have no current intention to
> unilaterally require structural separation of Telstra." So now we are back to no "current" intention. What about
> tomorrow? Next month? Next year?


Depends entirely on telstra's behavior, ****wit.

> With this dramatic example of wavering and indecisiveness at the highest level,


Not a ****ing clue, as always.

> all can now see why there is so little investment in broadband in Australia compared with the rest of the developed
> world.


Not a ****ing clue, as always.

> Responsible boards and executives do not invest billions of dollars in a new technology when a government that
> regulates 50 per cent of your revenue is so confused.


Then they get to lose the business to their competition, ****wit.



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