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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 06-10-2006, 03:59 AM
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Default Two Wireless Routers

I have just recently bought a d-link DI-624 wireless router, and although I do enjoy it's speed of 54 mbps it still doesn't have the range I would like. It is located upstairs causing the 3 computers in the downstairs of my house to have little or no signal. I was wondering if there was a way to hook up my old d-link DI-713P 11 mbps router to my new router and put it downstairs so I can have a stronger signal? Any input would be greatly appreciated.
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Old 06-10-2006, 11:25 AM
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Easy: connect the two via Ethernet and set them up with the same SSID and security settings Most routers don't support operating as a repeater unfortunately.
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Old 06-10-2006, 07:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NZLamb
Easy: connect the two via Ethernet and set them up with the same SSID and security settings Most routers don't support operating as a repeater unfortunately.
I don't want to sound like a complete idiot, but that's what I am when it comes to networking. Could you please go into a little more detail? I'm with you as far as plugging in one of the ports on my new router to the wan on the old one downstairs. But from there, I'm lost. I don't know how I would access the settings on the old router let alone what to set them to.
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Old 06-10-2006, 10:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrtopher
I don't know how I would access the settings on the old router let alone what to set them to.
No worries. Firstly disconnect the old router from the network if it isn't already to prevent any possible conflicts.

The first stage is to find out the IP address of your new router. If you are not sure what this is, go to Start, Run, type in cmd and press Enter. In the command prompt window, type in ipconfig -all and press Enter again. You should get a pile of settings dumped onto your screen, the one we are after is the default gateway and subnet mask. The default gateway address will be the IP of your router. This is all assuming you run Windows.

There should be a little reset button on the back of the old router. Let the router boot up then hold this down until it restarts again (the power light will flash). This will reset it back to factory defaults. At this stage you should connect it directly to a PC via Ethernet, separately from the rest of your network.

Follow the same steps above on the PC connected to your old router. Make sure the subnet masks are the same (I ask this because D-Link seem to have double standards in this regard). Enter the router IP into your web browser and login using the default user and password (probably admin/default, you will need to consult the manual).

Look for a setting regarding the LAN IP of the router and change this to suit your new router. This is a toughie to explain quickly in writing, basically if the new router IP is 192.168.1.1 and the subnet mask is 255.255.255.0, the old router can be set to 192.168.1.2 with subnet mask 255.255.255.0. If it's different and you get stuck, just give us a yell.

While you are logged into the old router, disable the DHCP server. Where you access this depends on the router, just look for 'DHCP' somewhere. Lastly, set up the wireless side of it so that the SSID (network name) and security settings match that of your new router. Make sure the channels you are using on both routers are at least five apart (e.g. use 1 and at least 6) to help reduce interference. If you are not sure on these settings, login into the configuration of your new router to check. If you don't have any wireless security set up, now is the time to do it (WEP is fine).

Now connect both routers via an Ethernet cable to any LAN port on each router. You shouldn't need a crossover cable for this; most Ethernet equipment nowdays is smart enough to figure this out by itself.

A bit long-winded but I hope it helps. If you get stuck just holler out and someone will be here!
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Old 06-11-2006, 12:37 AM
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Ok, I hooked the old router up to a computer downstairs and checked the default gateway and dns. On both routers the defualt gateway is 192.168.0.1 and the dns is 255.255.255.0. So I set the LAN IP on the old router to 192.168.0.2 (don't know if that was right). Then I turned off the DHCP, turned it to channel 1 (the new one is on channel 6), enbaled a 64-bit WEP encryption using the same password as on the new router, and changed the SSID form "DEFAULT" to "dlink" which is the SSID on my new router. I then plugged it into an ethernet cable connected to the new router. But here is where I ran into some trouble. When I searched for a wireless connection on the computer downstairs, instead of displaying both routers it only displayed the one "dlink". I assume this is suppossed to happen, but after putting in the password and connecting, I get "limited or no connection." The signal strength is excellent and the speed is 11mbps (compared to my new 54 mbps upstairs) so I'm guessing that I am connected to the right router, but I still have no internet connection. Sorry for so many questions, I greatly appreciate your help.
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Old 06-11-2006, 01:22 AM
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Sounds like you are on exactly the right track. Your PC isn't getting an IP address from the network, so you I'd say you have either entered the wrong WEP key (it won't tell you if it's wrong), or connected the wrong port of the old router to the network. Check these and report back
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Old 10-26-2007, 05:04 PM
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Also, the computer could have the firewall turned on.
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Old 10-26-2007, 05:07 PM
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I am in a similar situation. I know how to do everything that has been mentioned so far. My question is; would it be possible to setup the second router on the same SSID and security, but not have it physically plugged into the first router? Basically, i have no way of hardwiring the second router to the first one. Would the second router be ableto talk to the first one wirelessly so that i didn't have to plug it into the lan port of the first router? Thanks.
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Old 02-19-2009, 01:45 AM
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The problem with no internet that you are having is that you disabled the DHCP control. By doing this you will have to set your IP, Subnet Mask, Gateway, and DNS servers manually on each computer. For this you will need to figure out which router each computer will connect to as one will more than likely have a Gateway ID of 192.168.0.1 and the other 192.168.1.1. The first two numbers will be the same, the third denotes gateway/switch tier, and the last denotes device number. As such IP's for the first router will start with 192.168.0.XXX and the second one 192.168.1.XXX IP's usually use 2-254 for the last digit depending on router. For your subnet mask it will always be 255.255.255.0 and then for your DNS servers you will need to look at the Embedded Web Server EWS for your modem and look at your WAN status to find them. For EWS access simply type in 192.168.0.1 in internet explorers address bar for access to your modem, then 192.168.X.1 for each consecutive router, this will give you full access to all settings in each device. FYI Secure these when you get in because otherwise anyone on your network will be able to change these.
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Old 03-08-2009, 01:24 AM
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Does having two routers using the same ssid and settings (except for channel) mean that if I connect to one with my laptop and leave it's range and go into the range of the other, does it automatically move over to the other router? Also, if my friends bring a laptop over and they try to connect, since they only see the one network on the computer, does it connect to the strongest router?
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Old 04-11-2009, 04:26 AM
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Thumbs up u have to plug in correct lan port

well "MRTOPHER", as "NZLamb" said that u might have inserted the RJ-45(ethernet) wire into wrong port on old router.. so try it by inserting it into INTERNET's port and not in 1 to 4 lan ports... after that mostly your problem would be solved.

in fact i m also trying same thing at my home but it will take around 2 days for me to set it up. so i will get back later after its done till than try it..
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Old 08-17-2009, 05:51 PM
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Default UPDATED MY ROUTER?? Now What...

Hello, I recently moved apartment locations and changed some hardware settings on my computer. My roommate has a laptop and I have a PC. My PC has existing settings with a Linksys router and his laptop is using a Belkin router. I plan on connecting his router to my PC to setup a home network. My PC will be hardline connected and his laptop wirelessly Would I have to resetup the modem settings on my WinXP machine for that to work? If there's more explanation needed on anything contact me.



Much Appreciated, AW


Belkin F5D7234-4 v3
PC Windows XP SP2
Laptop Toshiba Satellite Win Vista
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Old 06-22-2010, 12:39 AM
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To do this, you have to:

1. Plug in your computer to router 1 and configure it's "Local IP Address" to 192.168.2.1
2. Give it whatever SSID you want to give it.
3. Set a password if you want.
4. Make sure it's setup as DHCP also. DHCP is like a bridge. A bridge between the modem and the computer. So we want both routers to be setup as DHCP, they are just going to be bridges.

(Notice that after changing the Local IP Address to your router, you might need to access the default gateway again, which now should be 192.168.2.1 instead of 192.168.1.1. Also, if for some reason it does not allow you to access the router again you will need to renew your IP on your network adapter, to do that, open Command Prompt, type in without quotes "ipconfig /release" and then "ipconfig /renew". You should then be able to access the router again.)

4. Plug in your computer to router 2 and make sure the Local IP Address is not the same as the first router. Make sure it's something like 192.168.1.1. We do not want the second to last number (192.168.x.1) to be the same on the two routers, as that will create an issue.
5. Give your Router 2 your SSID and password if you want.
6. Make sure it's DHCP.

Then you will need to have your Router 1 working as usual, and then just plug in the Router 2 to your Router 1 as if it were a computer. Notice that the ethernet cord will go from the Ethernet port on Router 1, to the Internet Port on Router 2. Then Router 2 will be your second wireless network.

(If at anytime you are not able to reconnect to the router, make sure to do the ipconfig /release and /renew.)

Hope this works, let me know if you need a more detailed explanation.
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Old 07-14-2010, 05:08 AM
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Default Two Wireless Routers

Your PC isn't getting an IP address from the network, so you I'd say you have either entered the wrong WEP key (it won't tell you if it's wrong), or connected the wrong port of the old router to the network. Check these and report back
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Old 07-15-2010, 07:08 AM
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These post is good to share with if you want to connect two wireless router then it might be possible. . Plug in your computer to router 1 and configure it's "Local IP Address", Give it whatever SSID you want to give it, Set a password if you want. Then it might be work.
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Old 07-28-2010, 09:55 AM
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You're really smart and friendly which is why you have exchanged information to connect two wireless routers and I am sure that anyone can use this knowledge as you have shared it very easy and understandable. Connect your computer to a router and configure the local IP address, giving him all this SSID you want to give it a password if you wish. Thus, it may be working.
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Old 10-26-2011, 03:42 PM
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Default strange behaviour

Hi All,

I have 2 routers, they both broadcast the same SSID with the same security settings. I have perfect connection, but I have something strange :
- everywhere I read that the two routers have to be setup on non-overlapping channels, that gives me regular drops, while when I use the same channel, I have good results... somebody can explain?

I tried the following
- channel 6 and 6 : perfect results
- Channel 6 and 11 : regular drop of connection, bad quality of signal, my phone does not reconnect properly when I come back home, one of my laptop seems not to find proper SSID
- Channel 1 and 11 : same as above
- Channel 1 and auto : same as above
- channel 1 and 1 : perfect results

Is there anything to see with the distance? the two routers are actually pretty close, but with thick armed wall in between (ergo, the needs to have 2).

Thanks to satisfy my curiosity. I am on channel 1 for both now.
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Old 11-11-2011, 11:38 PM
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Default Where can I find Ugg Classic Boots?

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This online store that I recommend carries Ugg classic boots in all sizes - and the best thing is, they offer free shipping when order over 100 USD ,the boots are fantastic.to know more about the supply ,you can kindly visit
www globlebrand com
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Old 01-03-2012, 11:28 AM
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Default Elelid

Happy New Year to all !
I am not completely idiot with the computing, but in network ...already several days can't make working net with two routers.

Let we take the absolutely clear schematic from .../how-tos/connecting-2-routers-together-37891.html and asume that one of them is modem ADSL2+wireless router and another just wireless router. On first one I can change its own IP address, on second can not (192.168.1.1)
The question is: It's make sense what router has the lowest nomber.
I never see that IP pool of any router has the lower numbers than its own IP.
Is it possible? It's make sense in what router I will disable DHSP?

Let say I will assign for modem+router IP 192.168.1.30 and pool from 192.168.1.1 up tp 192.168.1.20. Second just router will have IP 192.168.1.1 and disable DHCP. Same SSID and key on both routers. The main desktop I will hard connect with second router. As slaves wireless I want to use laptop, wireless printer, Samsung Tab and Samsung I9000 phone.
Shoud it works?

Thanks a lot for any response
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Old 01-03-2012, 11:14 PM
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It should work as you said.

Per my experience, I would put the DHCP on the router who has the external connection to Internet.

I am surprise that you can not change the IP on the second router, but whatever, this is not a problem.

In your situation, my config would be :
- first router (the one with ADSL modem) : 192.168.1.2, DHCP activated
- Second router : 192.168.1.1, DHCP deactivated
- DHCP pool : 192.168.0.10 and above

Why do I put the router IP back below the IP Pool? simply to be able to extend the pool without issue. you can also take 192.168.1.254.

At home, I have 3 routers (only 2 in use), their IP are 192.168.0.1, .2 and .3, then I setup DHCP lease so my devices always get the same IP (without needing to set them in static IP on each of them). I have a very good experience on the network. And I have made families : IP ending in 10x are PC, 11x are phones, 12x are entertainment box, ... very easy to remember the IP of every single box.
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Old 01-05-2012, 08:00 AM
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Thank you Memes

It tooks one more days to setup everything working. The case was that Cisco E1000 router doesn't accept several chandges at one time. First need to change it IP address, turn it OFF and ON again and just after this I can change all the rest. On my Dynalink modem/router I was able to make right setup all at once time.
Information for you. For begining I set different channels 5 and 11. Everything working fine. But then I set on both routers the same channel -
11. Everything working fine. It seems to me Internet begin working even faster. This is my feeling, can't prof this. As proffesional in electronics I think it could work in the small areas, when delay of signal from/to different sourses so small they almost the same. When signal' delay become more different when you came close to one router and far away from the other, better to use different channels. My appartment is less than 100 square meters and the distanse between two routers about 7-8 m. But this just idea.
It will be interesting to hear another opinions

Best regards
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Old 01-05-2012, 09:24 AM
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Thanks for your ideas, it will indeed be interesting to have more opinions. I thought is was due to overlapping waves rather than delay.
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